Lifestyle: listening to YouTube

More lifestyle self-tutoring: the tutor reflects on a habit he’s “rediscovered.”

Nowadays, I cook a lot, do a lot of dishes, and so on, usually alone. In my experience, reading isn’t feasible while moving around the kitchen. Listening, however, is.

My kids brought me the habit of listening to YouTube. I’ve noticed them “watching” it, sometimes with only a static image on the screen while a narrator talks. Then, they’re not “watching” YouTube; rather, they’re listening to the narrator tell a story.

In retirement, my mother’s father had the radio on often. My mother, when I was a kid, listened to it for hours a day, while she was cooking, doing dishes, etc. I heard many stories narrated over the radio. As I recall, some were weekly serials that extended over months or longer.

On a blustery winter Saturday or Sunday, I’d hear the radio story from the next room. Not meaning to, I’d get caught up in it. I might even have looked forward, sometimes, to the next installment. On Canada’s Atlantic, winters are long: many weekends might be spent indoors.

Today, YouTube has many channels that focus on storytelling, with just a static picture on the screen, or even an altogether blank screen: the radio habit lives on.

There is much more to say about the premise of story listening. I hope to continue this thread in coming posts:)

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Oil changes: is there a rule of thumb for how often?

More lifestyle self-tutoring: the tutor inquires about oil change frequency.

I suddenly wondered: Is there a “rule of thumb” for mileage between oil changes?

Of course, the manufacturer’s advice for any specific model should be followed.

Moreover, newer cars often have an advisory function so that the onboard computer indicates when the oil needs changing. Obviously that advice would be important to follow.

In the absence of such advice, an oil change every 3000 to 5000 miles (5000 to 8000 km) seems to be the general recommendation. It coincides with the advice I’ve been given for the van my family drives.

Source:

www.kbb.com

mahalodotcom

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Diy: can new silicone be added over old?

Diy self-tutoring: the tutor explores the idea of redoing a silicone seal.

When a silicone seal gives up, or likely soon will, it needs to be repaired.

Can you apply new silicone over top an old seal to fill a crack that’s developed, for instance?

The associate at the hardware store tells me no: you can’t add new silicone on top of old. Therefore, to repair a silicone seal, you must remove it, clean and prep the site, then lay down a fresh one.

Source:

www.caulkyourhome.com

diy.stackexchange.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Computer networks: what is a switch?

More technology self-tutoring: the tutor explains his understanding of switch, a term he’s found tricky to define.

For background, my post from April 2, as well as my post from yesterday, connect with today’s topic.

Switches can be used in a variety of ways, so a simple conception only explains one application. However, I find this idea helpful:

Imagine a self-contained local network of computers physically connected. A given member can send a message to a specific other, or to all others at once. Then, the simplest central connection among these computers is a switch.

A switch is different from a hub (once again, my post from yesterday) in that the switch can forward a message to a specific intended recipient, whereas the hub just forwards it to everyone.

Source:

askleo.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Computer science, networks: what is a hub?

More technology self-tutoring: the tutor investigates the term hub in networking.

hub (in computer network):
a central device to which computers can be connected to form a local network. Data the hub receives from one computer will be forwarded to all the others to which it’s connected.

Source:

askleo.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Lifestyle, cooking: the different types of oats

More lifestyle self-tutoring: the tutor explains the three classifications of oats you might normally hear about.

  1. Groats: kernels from oat plants. They’ve had the outer, inedible husk removed.
  2. Steel-cut oats: groats that have been cut into two or three pieces by a steel blade.
  3. Rolled oats: oat kernels first steamed, then pressed flat under rollers.

Source:

wholegrainscouncil.org

www.livestrong.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Lifestyle, baking: a chocolate cake recipe without cocoa

Lifestyle self-tutoring: the tutor shares a recipe that’s proven popular.

Some weeks ago:

“If I bake something, what would you like?”

“Chocolate cake.”

Not too surprised, I went searching for a recipe. The first I found asks for more cocoa than I had.

I did have chocolate chips, so queried a chocolate cake recipe that uses them. I found this one, which my family loved. I’ve since made it a second time, and it came out even better.

I’m always impressed with a recipe that is done when the cook time says. This one says bake 40-45 minutes; both times I made it, it was done at 40 minutes.

Good baking:)

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Computer science, networks: what is a Peer-to-peer (P2P) network?

More self-tutoring about computer networks: the tutor shares the definition of peer-to-peer network.

Peer-to-Peer (P2P) network:

A network in which any computer is directly connected to any other, rather than through a server. The premise of P2P seems to be that the members are physically connected by wire.

The arrangement could be two computers connected, for example, by USB. It could also be a larger set of computers all connected along one main rail.

Source:

www.computerworld.com

www.w3schools.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Web design: analogous colors

Tutoring web design, color is a focus. The tutor mentions analogous colors.

One point of view about color imagines a “color wheel”. The wheel is divided into thirds, one for each of the primary colors red, yellow, and blue. Between the primaries are mixes:

An analogous color set is one that occupies no more than one continuous third of the color wheel. Therefore, pink to orange or purple to teal might be examples of analogous color sets.

Source:

Beaird, Jason. The Principles of Beautiful Web Design. SitePoint Pty Ltd, 2010.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Biology: what mineral form of calcium is found in bones?

Tutoring biology, the question about calcium in bone – specifically, which mineral form it takes – might arise. The tutor discusses it.

The hardness of bone comes from the presence of hydroxyapatite:

hydroxyapatite:

Ca5(PO4)3OH

found in bones and giving them their hardness.

Source:

answersingenesis.org

www.iofbonehealth.org

www.fluidnova.com

www.w3schools.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.