Celery: health benefits

Self-tutoring about nutrition: the tutor gives celery a closer look.

As a vegetable, celery is convenient to serve. It needn’t be peeled, just washed and chopped into sticks. It’s not my kids’ favourite, but dietary variety is important.

I wondered if celery is nutritious; apparently, it is, with numerous vitamins and minerals, and significant antioxidants. Moreover, it offers anti-inflammatory benefits, and even helps against cholesterol.

Serving celery with meals seems even easier to justify than I’d thought:)

Source:

www.whfoods.com

draxe.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Pearly everlasting

Identifying plants means constant self-tutoring. The tutor shares another find: pearly everlasting.

I know I’ve seen pearly everlasting elsewhere; it grows very commonly on the west coast. Yet, I’ve never thought to identify it.

The flowers really are pearly white, though the centres are darker. The leaves are long, thin, and lance-shaped, and may even gain in prominence as the stem ascends. The blossoms are many, and can last a long time.

Source:

Pojar, Jim and Andy MacKinnon. Plants of Coastal British Columbia. Vancouver: BC Ministry of Forests and Lone Pine Publishing, 1994.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Mead vs meed: homonyms

Tutoring English, homonyms always interest. The tutor mentions the pair mead and meed.

mead: alcoholic drink made from fermented honey.

meed: deserved compensation.

Source:

Barber, Katherine et al. Oxford Canadian Dictionary of Current English. Don Mills: Oxford University Press, 2005.

www.merriam-webster.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

What is the point of gardening?

Self-tutoring: the tutor delves into the philosophy behind urban gardening.

In the late ’80s I talked to a farmer, and survivalist, who lived way up north. He didn’t have a garden. His wife did; he snickered at its mention.

“You’re a survivalist…why don’t you believe in gardening?” he was sometimes asked.

“It’s much cheaper to buy produce at the grocery store,” he would smile. “If you think of the money you could earn for the time spent tending a garden, you come out way behind, gardening.”

He didn’t talk much, that man, and he was almost always right when he did. Back then, he could make $20/hour for working…why would he garden?

My father had a garden in the 80s in a region where agriculture is favourable. Yet, our home sat on a sand hill; our soil wasn’t so good as that of our neighbours across the street, who lived on the flat.

I came to learn that my father loved gardening. Evenings from late spring to early fall, he’d spend out in the back yard. Sometimes he tended the garden, while other times he’d stand there, smoking a cigarette, surveying it. He was proud of the garden. No-one else could see it; our garden lay behind a bluff that backed onto woods. He took personal pride in it, regardless.

About a third of his time out there, he spent planning what he’d do next year. If I went out to talk to him, he’d discuss the crop, but soon begin about how the soil was better than last year, and what he’d yet do to improve it. We were surrounded by deciduous trees whose leaves he collected each autumn, then tilled into the garden. He loved talking about compost.

During our three years there, he improved the soil a great deal, from almost pure sand to darker stuff more like loam. However, he was a military man; we had to move. All that progress was lost to him when we moved away to live on a base.

My father had known, when we arrived there, that we were destined only to move away in a few years. Yet, his compass, first to last, was improving the soil. We ate delicious produce from the garden – I still remember the first tomato we picked from it and how good it tasted. However, he didn’t mainly talk about that. Rather, he talked about how good the soil would be next spring or how much it could improve after ten years of composting.

My only conclusion is that Dad’s point to gardening was to improve the soil. Whatever produce we ate from it – and we certainly did – was a bonus.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English: what is a maven?

Self-tutoring about English: the tutor mentions maven, a word he’s long wondered about.

Here and there, I’ve seen the word maven over the years, but never knew what it meant. Finally I got the notion to look it up:

maven: one with expert knowledge on the subject in question.

Source:

Mish, Frederick C. (editor). The Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Springfield: Merriam-Webster, 2004.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Earth science, geology: p-waves and s-waves

Tutoring earth science, p-waves and s-waves might arise. The tutor gives quick definitions.

p-waves:

compression waves from a seismic event (eg earthquake). These waves cause the earth to vibrate in their direction of travel. Imagine how a shock-absorber in a car moves: that models a p-wave as it reaches and passes each point.

s-waves:

transverse waves from a seismic event: they are similar to water waves you see in a pool.

P-waves are sometimes called primary waves, since they arrive at a distant location before the S-waves (aka secondary waves). In fact, primary waves travel about twice as fast as secondary.

Source:

Trefil, James, Ph.D., et al. The Changing Earth. Evanston: McDougall Littell, 2005.

walrus.wr.usgs.gov

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English: two meanings of pavement

Tutoring English, a word’s true meaning might hold surprise. The tutor mentions pavement.

pavement: (noun)

  1. the material that a car travels on in an urban setting.

  2. a hard-surfaced way similar to 1., but alongside the road, for pedestrians only: the sidewalk. Such is the British point of view.

Source:

separatedbyacommonlanguage.blogspot.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English: what does dragoon mean?

Tutoring English, so many word discoveries happen. The tutor mentions dragoon.

dragoon (1. noun:military):

soldier on horseback; cavalry soldier.

dragoon (2. verb):

to cause someone to do something they would rather not, by manipulation or intimidation.

I’ve been known to dragoon my kids to practice the piano.

Source:

Barber, Katherine, et al (editors). Oxford Canadian Dictionary of Current English. Don Mills: Oxford University Press, 2005.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Web browsers: Chrome: the “reopen tab” key combination

Self-tutoring: I often close tabs by mistake. The tutor mentions a solution when it happens.

On Chrome, in Windows, it’s my experience that Ctrl+Shift+t will reopen the last tab you closed, and that it will reopen where it last was.

The trick also seems to work with ie:)

Source:

productforums.google.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Image processing: png vs jpg: when they’re the same size….

Self-tutoring about image formats: the tutor shares a find.

In my post from June 6, I include a photo of a spider taken from my phone. I saved it both as a .png and a .jpg (aka,.jpeg), same dimensions, etc. I thought the .jpg file would be smaller (in memory) than the .png one. Interestingly, they are the same, at 55kB.

I researched how a .jpg and its corresponding .png image can be the same size. It turns out that, indeed, they can, and here’s the reasoning:

Both .png and .jpg use compression. The .png finds patterns among pixels, so compresses according to the predictability. The .jpg, on the other hand, potentially reduces the colour variety from pixel to pixel in ways the human eye may barely notice – if at all.

Therefore, just for an example, a photo entirely one single colour value might likely be compressed smaller in the .png than the .jpg format, since it’s absolutely predictable.

In its original application, .png does not allow for loss – meaning that if a pixel can’t be predicted, it’s recorded uniquely. Therefore, a .png image might need more memory than its .jpg counterpart. However, if the image processing software can find enough pattern in the image – and if the colors don’t show tremendous variety in the first place – then apparently a .png file can end up the same memory size as its corresponding .jpg – maybe even smaller!

I hope to post more about image formats:)

Source:

www.techradar.com

medium.com

stackoverflow.com

stackoverflow.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.