Are dandelions an invasive species?

Tutoring English, one is interested in definitions. The tutor examines the definition of invasive species in connection with the common dandelion.

The common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) is from Europe, rather than native to North America. Although it seems to be virtually everywhere, is it an invasive species? Perhaps not.

An invasive species is able to enter nature and displace native species. Yet, the dandelion grows in the human footprint. Some wonder if, truly, the dandelion lives in wild nature, outside of human influence. If not, it’s not invasive.

Source:

bangordailynews.com

Pojar, Jim and Andy MacKinnon. Plants of Coastal British Columbia. Vancouver: BC Ministry of Forests and Lone Pine Publishing, 1994.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

What is default text (font) size on Chrome?

Self-tutoring about the Chrome browser: the tutor measures its default font size in pixels.

I opened the Chrome settings and found its font set to “medium”.

I then made a quick page with two divs: one set at 20em, then the other at the pixel width so it matches the first. The matching pixel width turns out to be 320px. Importantly, I didn’t define font size anywhere on the page. Doing so can prejudice the results.

An em, typically is “one character.” Therefore, if 20em=320px, then 1em=16px. On this browser, anyway, the default font size is 16px.

Interesting, eh?

Source:

j.eremy.net

mozilla.org

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Homonyms: filter and philter

Tutoring English, homonyms are a favourite topic of mine. The tutor mentions the pair filter and philter.

A filter is a porous barrier to separate solids from liquid; a philtre is a magic potion – often, specifically, a love potion.

“Philtre” can also be spelled “philter.”

Source:

Gilmour, Lorna (editor). Collins Essential Canadian English Dictionary & Thesaurus. Glasgow: HarperCollins, 2006.

Mish, Frederick C. (editor). Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Springfield: Merriam-Webster, 2004.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

What does apposite mean?

Tutoring English, vocabulary is always interesting. The tutor mentions the word apposite.

apposite adj: cleverly chosen for the situation.

The meal of cold-cut sandwiches was apposite, given the hot weather.

Source:

Barber, Katherine et al. Oxford Canadian Dictionary of Current English. Don Mills: Oxford University Press, 2005.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Crunchy peanut butter vs smooth: which is more popular, and by how much?

Self-tutoring about peanut butter preference: the tutor inquires about the popularity of crunchy vs smooth.

We eat a lot of peanut butter, but have gone years without buying crunchy. I’d say 95% of the peanut butter we’ve ever bought has been smooth.

Yet, I notice crunchy peanut butter every time, and want to get it. I’ve always liked it, but of course, I like both. The question that finally crystallized in my mind: who does buy crunchy peanut butter, if we so rarely do?

It turns out about 60% of people prefer smooth peanut butter. I thought the difference would be much higher.

Recently we’ve been buying some chunky, some smooth:)

Source:

www.huffingtonpost.ca

www.survata.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

How rare is a four-leaf clover?

Self-tutoring about plant lore: the tutor researches four-leaf clovers.

The rarity of the four-leaf clover is around 1:10000, research suggests.

I’ve never found a four-leaf clover. However, one summer when I was a kid, one of my friends found one, I think in late May. That was when I was in grade 3, in PEI.

A week later the same kid found another. The trend continued all summer: he just kept finding them. I can’t recall anyone else ever doing so.

Some reading suggests that, because of genetics, four-leaf clovers might be found in clusters. However, that wasn’t how my friend found them; he found them anywhere. While we were awaiting other friends or wondering what to do next, he’d look down: “Another four-leaf clover!” he’d exclaim. He found one on a patch of earth almost bare of grass.

I always wondered how he did it, finding all those four-leaf clovers. I hope to find one someday. I left PEI when I was 10, and haven’t been back since. Yet, not having found a four-leaf clover there, even though I guess they were all around, leaves me to recall the wide blue skies and vast green fields and long sunny days of summer there.

My grade 8 kid just walked in. He says his friend, like mine from long ago, often found four-leaf clovers when they were in grade 3, but not really since. Curious, eh?

Source:

blog.minitab.com

thescienceexplorer.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Screen resolution, dp and ppi

Self-tutoring about technology: the tutor inquires about screen size, resolution, dp, and ppi.

Apparently, dp is 160x(screen size in inches).

Resolution means, as I understand, the logical, rather than physical, linear elements across the screen. The reason: ppi (pixels per inch, aka pixel density) is device-dependent.

Resolution may be given in px by px: for example, 1280 by 768 pixels.

To get dp, a formula is (resolution/ppi)*160.

Source:

material.io

stackoverflow.com

www.androidcentral.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

What is clarified butter, and what is ghee?

Self-tutoring about cooking: the tutor arrives at the definitions of clarified butter and ghee.

Clarified butter and ghee are not the same but can be explained as follows:

  1. Clarified butter is begun by heating butter at low heat so that it melts.
  2. As the butter melts, solids will sink to the bottom and a foam will form on top.
  3. The clarified butter is just the liquid without the foam or solids.
  4. If the butter is heated for longer, the liquid will deepen in color and the foam will solidify and sink. Then, the liquid is ghee.

Source:

www.thekitchn.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Flash point vs fire point: what is the difference?

Self-tutoring about safe temperature to heat cooking oil led the tutor to seek the difference between flash point and fire point.

At the flash point, the vapor is ignitable but will only burn with a continuous source of ignition. At the fire point, the vapor, once ignited, will burn independently, even if the ignition source is removed.

Source:

www.differencebetween.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

How to keep eggshell out of your baked goods

Self-tutoring about baking: the tutor shares a simple trick.

When you bake something, you definitely don’t want eggshell in it. Of course, it usually wouldn’t happen. However, the odd time, an egg might crack irregularly, so that a piece of shell separates from the rest and lands in the bowl with the egg.

It’s easy to retrieve the shell fragment if you can see it, which is why I try to remember to use a dark-colored bowl, and put the eggs in first. Then, if a shell fragment lands in the bowl, it’s easy to see and remove.

HTH:)

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.