Red elder tree flowers and fruits simultaneously

Self-tutoring about botany: the tutor shares an observation about a red elder.

I know of few trees that produce new blooms while their fruit is on. Yet, I (and now you, too) can witness a red elder doing so.

In the picture below, see the fruit at top left, the bloom at bottom right, on the same tree.

red elder tree with both berries and flower

Source:

Pojar, Jim and Andy MacKinnon. Plants of Coastal British Columbia. Vancouver: BC Ministry of Forests and Lone Pine Publishing, 1994.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

What does protocol mean?

Tutoring English, definitions are key. The tutor shares the meaning of protocol.

protocol (noun):

set of rules that define expected behaviour in a specific context.

Source:

Gilmour, Lorna (editor). Collins Essential Canadian English Dictionary and Thesaurus. Glasgow: HarperCollins, 2006.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

What is port forwarding?

More self-tutoring about computer networks: the tutor examines the idea of port forwarding.

From a practical point of view, port forwarding is a way to set up a router so that outside inquiries can reach a resource behind it, in the internal network.

Port forwarding relies on a two-part construct:

  1. The application the outside users want dwells on a dedicated device in the internal network;
  2. Said application is reached via a specific port on that specific device.

(See yesterday’s post for an explanation of what a port is.)

Typically, a router will block unsolicited traffic from accessing computers behind it, which is its firewall function.

Let’s imagine the application you want to enable outside users to access is reached via port x0y0 on local device D0. The port forward that will enable such access:

Router, when a request for port x0y0 arrives, send it along to D0, port x0y0.

Now, outside clients can reach that inner device D0, through the firewall and past the router, by virtue of their request for port x0y0. The setup is called port forwarding.

Source:

CCTV Camera Pros

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

What is a port in computer networking?

Self-tutoring about computer networks: the tutor offers a definition of the common networking term port.

A port can be physical or logical. A physical port is a plug-in socket at which to attach a device to the computer, such as a printer. USB ports comprise an example.

A logical port, such as port 80, designates the program a request desires to connect through. Port 80 means http activity. The logical ports on a computer are 0 to 65535.

Source:

searchnetworking.techtarget.com

SimplifiedTechExplanations

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

What does recondite mean?

Tutoring English, vocabulary is always interesting. The tutor mentions the definition of recondite.

recondite (adj): hard to follow or comprehend.

The book’s eplanation he found recondite.

Source:

Gilmour, Lorna (editor). Collins Essential Canadian English Dictionary & Thesaurus. Glasgow: HarperCollins, 2006.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Using the McAfee shredder, part 0: possible time it can take

Self-tutoring about home computer use: the tutor talks about using the McAfee shredder.

Lately I’ve been using the shredder on McAfee Internet Security. For small files it can be very fast.

This morning I used it on a file approximately 2GBytes. It took, I’d say, a half hour anyway. For a long time its progress reported an unchanging 50%. However, it finished around 10 minutes later. I guess its progress wasn’t updating during that period.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Additive and subtractive color models

Self-tutoring about colors: the tutor compares the additive and subtractive systems.

Additive color is the RGB model employed by devices that produce colored light – televisions, for example.

Subtractive color is the CMY (cyan, magenta, yellow) system for pigments. It assumes white light is all around: a colored object reflects some mix from it, which is the color the object is. The object absorbs the colors you can’t see; ie, it subtracts them.

Source:

www.xrite.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

New pop-up: “Your McAfee subscription has expired….”

More home computer self-tutoring: the tutor shares about another pop-up.

While working on the laptop today, I noticed a browser tab I didn’t recognize. I had many open and was pre-occupied, so didn’t check it right away. Eventually I did, to read as follows:

Windows Security Center: Your McAfee subscription has expired today….

I know, by now, that just because a message says it’s from Windows, doesn’t mean it is. I check the McAfee app: it says the subscription is Active. Next I check McAfee’s site report for the actual webpage:

Website Status: Unknown. We have to dig a litter deeper….

If McAfee itself doesn’t know about the expiration notice, supposedly for its own product, I figure the notice must be bogus. Next I check the web address of the pop-up:

antivirus-renewal.mcafee.com.abouttwentylettersandnumbers.trade/…..

The website appears, at first, to be from mcafee.com, but it’s actually from a .trade domain.

.trade is, apparently, a new top level domain.

Anyway, about the pop-up: I’ll just close the tab.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Is hoping insane?

Self-tutoring about psychology: the tutor shares a story.

Earlier this summer, I transplanted a rose bush from a shady spot to one in full sun. In the shade it had done okay, but had gone overlooked for years. I decided to give it a place all its own. We’ve had that rose bush for ten years or more, but it’s been transplanted a couple of times for one reason or another.

I know transplanting can be hard on plants. The bush had a few blooms when it was moved, and promptly lost them. A couple weeks later it started losing leaves, eventually losing every single one.

That bush has endured tough times before. Each day I checked it, hoping for a good sign. For weeks, though, all I got was bad news. Finally I had to leave for a week on business.

When I got back Friday evening, I visited the rose bush again, fearing the worst. What I saw I hardly believed: it had grown a bunch of fresh leaves! I was so excited.

I’ve heard so many times that repeating the same action, hoping for a different result, is the definition of insanity. Was I insane to keep checking that rose bush day after day, hoping for improvement, when for weeks all I saw was decline?

I guess the rose bush – and God – might have a different definition for insanity:)

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Dough too sticky – what to do?

Self-tutoring about baking: the tutor mentions a problem he sometimes encounters, with possible workarounds.

This morning, making scones, the dough was too sticky to work with – it wouldn’t let go my hands. I wondered what to do, and added about a half cup of milk. It made the dough workable, though not like normal. However, I did get it cut and into the oven. The scones were a little fluffier than usual, but fine.

Everyone else says I should have added more flour instead of milk. I’m not 100% convinced, but maybe I’ll try that next time. The “sticky dough” happens to me about one in ten times – I don’t know why.

Source:

www.craftybaking.com

www.youtube.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.