Microsoft web browser: how to tell which you’re using

Computer self-tutoring: the tutor mentions how to check which Microsoft browser you’re using.

In my experience, here is how to reveal the About info:

The three dots at top right, just under the x, hold a menu, under which, at the bottom, is Settings.

Opening the Settings option, a heading called About this app is near the bottom. There is described the browser: this one reports Microsoft Edge.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Home computer use: restart fix for sound problem

Self-tutoring about home computer use: the tutor mentions how a restart fixed a sound problem.

Over a week the sound from the main computer deteriorated. At the end it still wasn’t bad, but definitely noticeable. The kids wanted something done.

I went into the device manager – none of the sound devices was reporting a problem. I hooked another computer to the speakers; they sounded fine when it played through them. I wondered what the problem was.

Confounded, I turned off the computer and left it off for about 10 minutes, then restarted. Since then the sound is fine.

Source:

lifehacker.com

www.techwalla.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Spreadsheets: Excel: how to write text across multiple columns

Self-tutoring with Excel: the tutor shares a tip about extending text over multiple columns.

Let’s imagine you want to title a spreadsheet. You probably want to center the title at the top: likely it will run across more than one column, especially if the title font is larger than inside the sheet.

Here’s how I found to do so:

  1. Select the row across the top.
  2. Right-click the selection, then choose Format Cells.
  3. Choose the Alignment tab.
  4. Under Horizontal, click the dropdown menu to reveal Center Across Selection.
  5. Click Center Across Selection, then OK.

Source:

answers.microsoft.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Home computer use: shortcut key combinations: refreshing the page in the browser, Windows

More self-tutoring: the tutor mentions a shortcut to refresh the page in a browser.

Ctrl+F5

is meant to refresh the page in the browser. As I understand, the reload is from the server rather than from the cache.

Source:

www.getfilecloud.com

support.mozilla.org

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Web browsers, home computer use: setting the cursor in the search bar w/o using the mouse

Self-tutoring about home computer use: the tutor shares a keyboard shortcut to the search bar.

Ctrl+L
is meant to return the cursor to the search bar.

Source:

w3schools.com

lifehacker.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Computer skills: a search tip

For me, search skills lead to constant self-tutoring. The tutor shares a technique he’s noticed.

“word” ≠ “word ”

Searching my posts for the word fire, I got many results in which it was part of a word – Firefox and fireweed, for two examples. Yet, I wanted to find instances of just fire, but itself.

I wondered if typing in “fire ” instead of “fire” would change the results to give only those where fire stands alone.

What do you know – it worked:)

Source:

w3schools.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Windows, home computer use: command prompt file operations: xcopy

Maintaining a home computer requires frequent self-tutoring. The tutor shares.

This Windows 7 computer no longer performs the COPY command from the mouse, so I use the command prompt to copy files, etc.

Lately I’ve been backing up directories, which contain subdirectories and so on. (Directory can also be thought of as Folder.)

To copy an entire directory, including its subdirectories and the folders contained therein, I use the xcopy command:

xcopy source_directory destination_directory /e

or

xcopy source_directory destination_directory /s

With /e it copies the empty folders, but not with /s.

In my experience, assigning a destination directory is important, since xcopy doesn’t copy the enclosing directory itself, just its contents. So, for instance, if you want to copy the directory desktop0 to a backup called desktop0, you might key

xcopy the_source_path\desktop0 the_destination_path\desktop0 /e

Observations:

  1. Although you can use the forward slash to navigate in Windows, it can’t (in my experience) be used in paths in Windows commands. Rather, the backslash must be. For instance, topdir\dir1\dir2 must be used, rather than topdir/dir1/dir2, within a file command such as xcopy. However, for switches such as /s or /e, the forward slash is used.
  2. You can’t use xcopy from within a directory you’re telling it to copy. I typically do it from the one above.

Source:

www.lifewire.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Home computer use, computer maintenance, Windows: disk management: how to use unallocated space on a storage device

Home computer use, for me, leads to constant self-tutoring. The tutor shares a video about Windows disk management that he was lucky to find.

My experience: On an external hard drive, if Windows calls a part of it “unallocated”, you can’t store there.

What if you need the unallocated space? One option is to extend the adjacent partition (assuming it’s functional) so that it annexes the unallocated space for use.

In this video, David shows how to extend a useful partition so that it overtakes the unallocated space, making it, too, available for storage.

HTH:)

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Windows: file permissions: what does Bypass Traverse Checking mean?

Researching file permissions can mean self-tutoring. The tutor relays the idea of Bypass Traverse Checking.

Bypass Traverse Checking (file permission)

This permission allows a user to access a specific file that is not protected, but which resides in a folder the user does not have clearance to examine.

Under the Bypass Traverse Checking permission, the user can navigate to that specific file by its full path designation, without the operating system checking the user’s clearance regarding the containing folder. However, without the necessary clearance, the user cannot simply enter the folder.

Source:

www.pcreview.co.uk

docs.microsoft.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Home computer use: appeasing Windows 10

More self-tutoring: the tutor talks about a bump on his digital road.

Traveling, time is typically a concern for me. Though I’ve been doing it more and more, I’m still not accomplished at traveling. I can make it – but that’s about it.

When a computer crashes on the road, it’s even worse for me than at home, since time is tight anyway. This computer crashed this weekend while I’m over here in Abbotsford.

Twice, while using Chrome, I couldn’t post to my blog. After the second reboot, I’m using IE, with apparently no problems. Sometimes, when in doubt, I return to the on-board option – in this case it’s working (fingers crossed).

I’m a fan of Chrome. However, this moment, it seems not to be getting along with Windows 10, for whatever (likely temporary) reason. Actually, I’m a fan of IE as well.

Abbotsford has been great – more about that in a coming post.

Enjoy the rest of your weekend:)

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.