Lifestyle, cooking: what is parboiled rice?

For me, learning to cook means constant self-tutoring. The tutor shares what he discovered about parboiled rice.

Parboiled rice
When rice is harvested, each grain is inside a protective, inedible hull. During parboiling, the rice is steamed while still inside the hull, and nutrients dissolve from the hull into the rice grain.

Moreover, parboiled rice, when cooked, has grains less sticky, but rather more distinct, than has non-parboiled rice.

Parboiled rice is also called converted rice.

Source:

www.usarice.de

www.livestrong.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Lifestyle: cooking: what is freezer temperature meant to be?

Lifestyle, for me, leads to endless self-tutoring. The tutor shares the answer to a question he’s often wondered.

ideal freezer temperature

Freezer temperature is meant to be -18C or below (0F or below).

Apparently, food stored at -18C will remain safe to eat, although it may eventually lose its tastiness, depending on the duration.

Source:

www.fda.gov

www.thekitchn.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Lifestyle, cooking: microwave cooking: standing time

Still more lifestyle tutoring evolves as the tutor researches cooking with the microwave.

Standing time:

similar to resting time, it’s a period food is left alone after being cooked in the microwave.

The microwave targets some food molecules – water, for instance – preferentially. They absorb energy during microwave cooking. After removal from the microwave, that energy can transfer to surrounding food molecules, causing the portion to heat up. Therefore, the temperature of the portion can rise during standing time.

Source:
www.fsis.usda.gov

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Lifestyle, cooking: can you use wax paper in the microwave?

More lifestyle self-tutoring: the tutor researches if wax paper can safely be used in the microwave.

This week, I’m out of town, living in a hotel room that has a microwave oven. I don’t have any plates, bowls, etc.

I wondered if I could heat a sausage roll wrapped in wax paper, so I researched the situation:

Apparently, wax paper can safely be used in the microwave.

Source:

www.fsis.usda.gov

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Lifestyle, cooking: meat preservation: what does cure mean?

More lifestyle tutoring: the tutor researches the definition of cure in the context of meat preservation.

cure (verb):
to preserve, and hopefully enhance the flavour and perhaps the colour of, meat. When curing, any combination of salt, sugar, nitrite and/or nitrate might be used.

Source:

National Center for Home Food Preservation

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Lifestyle: cooking: substitute for baking powder

For me, learning to cook means constant self-tutoring. The tutor tells of a substitute he used, successfully, for baking power.

Last night, I planned “breakfast for dinner”: pancakes. However, the recipe I wanted to use calls for two teaspoons baking powder; at best I had only one left. My wife said the store was crazy busy, so I had to improvise.

I surfed to healthline.com, where I learned of ten possible substitutes for baking powder. I chose to use 1/4 tsp baking soda plus 1/2 tsp vinegar.

I added the baking soda to the dry ingredients, then, at the last instant, added the vinegar to the mix of egg, milk and oil. Next I mixed the wet and dry ingredients as indicated (making a well in the dry, pouring the wet in).

I was afraid the pancakes might taste of vinegar, but even my wife says they’re fine. No one complained.

Source:

allrecipes.com

healthline.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Lifestyle: food wrap: wax paper vs aluminum foil

More lifestyle self-tutoring: the tutor makes a preliminary comparison between wax paper and aluminum foil.

We’ve always used wax paper to wrap sandwiches, but a couple of weeks back we ran out. The only alternative on hand was aluminum foil, so I used it.

Aluminum foil I find easier to work with than wax paper, since it has a stronger memory. After wrapping the sandwiches I wondered if I could always just use aluminum foil from then on.

Apparently, aluminum foil and wax paper can be gotten for around the same price. So, if you like aluminum foil better for wrapping your sandwiches, it’s a viable alternative to wax paper.

Source:

www.walmart.ca

www.walmart.ca

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Lifestyle: do you have to proof yeast?

More lifestyle self-tutoring: the tutor wonders whether you need to proof yeast.

When I started making bread, the first kind of yeast I used was active dry yeast. I was under the impression you need to proof yeast, so did so each time.

Proofing, from my point of view, means putting the yeast in warm water with the sugar. Next, you wait until the yeast starts to change. When it starts to puff at the surface, it’s “proofed”.

I thought yeast needs to be proofed so that it will be properly active from the very start of the bread making process. However, I read today that proofing the yeast is just done to assure it’s alive. If it indeed is, then it will work fine (to make bread) without being proofed.

Proofing the yeast became part of the bread making process, for me; I’m sure I’ll continue doing it, even with fresh yeast.

Cheers:)

Source:

blog.kingarthurflour.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Lifestyle: how to cook pasta

Yet more lifestyle self-tutoring shared by the tutor, who wondered yesterday if he was cooking pasta correctly.

When I was a kid, someone told me to add oil to the water when cooking pasta. My wife, however, says not to.

Apparently, my wife was right. (When is it else-wise?) Here are some tips I picked up, yesterday, from my research about cooking pasta:

  1. Don’t add oil to the water.
  2. Don’t put in the pasta until the water is boiling fiercely.
  3. Add salt when the water starts to boil.
  4. Cook the pasta in a big pot, with abundant water. (My wife says so as well.)
  5. Don’t rinse the pasta after it’s cooked.

Source:

www.smithsonianmag.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Lifestyle: stainless steel pots and heat conduction

Yet more lifestyle self-tutoring: the tutor shares a find from cooking.

I don’t like getting burned, so use oven mitts whenever something might be hot.

Yesterday, I was boiling water to cook pasta. I used a higher-quality pot than I usually do: Normally I just use the ordinary pots, leaving my wife to use the “better” ones.

I had the lid on the pot so the water would boil faster. When I could hear the water boiling, I looked at the lid – specifically, at its metal handle.

The lids of the pots I normally use have wooden handles, so are safe to grab even when hot. However, since this pot’s handle is metal, I wondered if it would be safe to touch. Beneath it, of course, was boiling water – would the lid burn me?

Reaching out, I gave the handle a light touch and found it to be safe. Surprised, I lifted the lid off, added the pasta, and continued cooking. Yet I wondered how the handle could be cool, when in contact with a lid above boiling water.

Today, research tells me that stainless steel has poor heat conductivity – meaning its temperature doesn’t rise or fall easily, even when around ojects hotter or colder.

I placed the lid back on the pot after reducing the heat. The handle did become noticeably warmer later, but still safe to lift the lid off quickly.

The pot doesn’t say its metal on it; I surmise it must be stainless steel.

Source:

www.huffingtonpost.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.