Biology: pH range of blood

Tutoring biology, as well as hearing new ideas about nutrition, might lead to the topic of blood pH.

On the pH scale, 7 is neutral, below 7, acid, and above 7, alkaline (or base).

Human blood pH range, for health, is between 7.35 and 7.45. For survival, it’s between 6.8 and 7.8, according to conventional wisdom.

Source:

acutecaretesting.org

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Biology: what mineral form of calcium is found in bones?

Tutoring biology, the question about calcium in bone – specifically, which mineral form it takes – might arise. The tutor discusses it.

The hardness of bone comes from the presence of hydroxyapatite:

hydroxyapatite:

Ca5(PO4)3OH

found in bones and giving them their hardness.

Source:

answersingenesis.org

www.iofbonehealth.org

www.fluidnova.com

www.w3schools.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Biology, nursing: what is blood serum, vs blood plasma?

Tutoring biology, you might be asked about blood serum and/or blood plasma. The tutor mentions a distinction.

In yesterday’s post I give an explanation of blood plasma: it’s blood minus the red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Some people might see it as the liquid that carries the blood cells and platelets.

Blood serum is related, but has a specific difference from plasma:

blood serum:

plasma after fibrinogen has been removed from it.

Fibrinogen is a protein that weaves the physical blood clot.

Source:

Mader, Sylvia S. Inquiry into Life, 9th ed. Toronto: McGraw-Hill, 2000.

www.w3schools.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Biology, nursing: what is blood plasma?

Tutoring biology, you might be asked about blood plasma. The tutor mentions its defintion.

blood plasma:

the liquid that holds the red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The plasma consists of water and substances suspended or dissolved therein: proteins, salts, etc.

Plasma does not include blood cells or platelets.

Source:

Mader, Sylvia S. Inquiry into Life, 9th ed. Toronto: McGraw-Hill, 2000.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Botany: trees in Victoria: live oak

Tree idenitification leads to self-tutoring: the tutor describes a find in Victoria.

Victoria’s assortment of trees is amazing. Last fall I mentioned seeing a gingko biloba as well as an amur corktree there.

I’ve read a few times that there is a live oak on Dallas Road, near the breakwater. Yesterday I decided to drive by to check.

Indeed, there is one, I’d say: it’s across Dallas Road from the breakwater, a bit closer to downtown. It’s really noticeable right now, being the only tree around with leaves.

The tree leans out to the road. I left the car and walked by it, then back, not really stopping. The house owner (my assumption) was sitting in the yard, so I didn’t want to intrude by stopping and staring at the tree. He gave me a friendly nod; I think he knew I was examining the tree. I think people commonly do.

Thanks, Vic!

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Health: what is cortisol and what does it do, part 0

Researching the human body can mean continual self-tutoring. The tutor begins about the critical hormone cortisol.

Cortisol is a hormone produced by the adrenal glands. Its release is augmented when the person feels stress. It has many effects; what follows is one mechanism in which it participates. The first two points are necessary background, while the third explains a function of cortisol:

  1. The human body interprets stress as physical danger rather than a social condition.
  2. Neither brain cells nor exercising skeletal muscle cells need insulin for glucose uptake. However, as I understand, fat cells do need insulin to import glucose.
  3. Cortisol increases blood sugar but inhibits insulin secretion and possibly even insulin sensitivity. Doing so channels the glucose (blood sugar) towards use by the muscles and brain, rather than by the fat cells (which would change it to fat for storage). Therefore, under stress, the muscles and brain have access to lots of energy so they can respond.

I hope to talk more about cortisol:)

Source:

www.todaysdietician.com

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

www.oracletutoring.ca

www.psychologytoday.com

www.webmd.com

www.diabetes.org

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English, botany: what is a pomologist?

More self-tutoring: the tutor shares a term he discovered today.

pomologist (noun):
one engaged in pomology, which is the science occupied with fruit itself, and/or its production.

Source:

modernfarmer.com

www.collinsdictionary.com

www.w3schools.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Botany: where did peanuts originate?

Thinking about common foods can lead to self-tutoring. The tutor shares his find about where peanuts originate.

peanut origin

Peanuts originate from South America. Likely they were first domesticated in Bolivia or Argentina. The Portuguese, who colonized Brazil, brought peanuts to be cultivated in Africa.

Source:

www.fs.fed.us

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Biology: what is GMO?

Tutoring biology, everyday questions surface. The tutor shares the meaning of GMO.

GMO (noun): Genetically Modified Organism

An organism whose DNA contains sequences from more than one species. Although this individual may have arisen by natural reproduction, either it, or one of its ancestors, had its DNA altered by scientifically developed means.

Source:

gmo-awareness.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Cholesterol: hdl vs ldl

More lifestyle tutoring: the tutor continues to research cholesterol.

Perhaps many of us have heard that HDL is the “good” cholesterol, while LDL is the “bad”. What’s the difference?

HDL: collects cholesterol from the blood and conveys it to the liver, where it will be cleansed from the body.

LDL: conveys cholesterol to an artery, where it may be deposited to form plaque. As a result, the artery wall thickens, while its room for blood passage decreases.

Source:

www.heart.org

www.healthline.com

www.cdc.gov

www.heart.org

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.