Lifestyle: taurine, part 1

Going online for self-tutoring about energy drinks, the tutor follows the leads as they come: more about taurine.

In yesterday’s post I began about taurine and reported that two sources suggest 3000mg per day, in most cases, is thought to be safe–I’m sure that’s for an adult.

Why is taurine in energy drinks, anyway? What possible benefit might it convey?

Supposedly, taurine (within safe dosage, of course) can offer the following benefits:

  1. Taurine can decrease anxiety.
  2. Taurine can promote fat burning.
  3. Taurine can increase insulin sensitivity.
  4. Taurine can elevate testosterone.
  5. Taurine is an antioxidant.
  6. Taurine can increase exercise performance, and may also help recovery.
  7. Taurine can help lower blood pressure.
  8. Taurine, with magnesium, can promote better sleep.
  9. Taurine, with caffeine, can enhance mental performance.

I suspect that several of the benefits above are not typically what people imagine when they reach for energy drinks.

Source:

main.poliquingroup.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Lifestyle: taurine, part 0

Lifestyle means constant self-tutoring. The tutor begins research about taurine.

I was talking to a student the other day who consumes energy drinks. She mentioned they can be controversial, so I asked why. The caffeine and taurine content, she answered, are two points of concern.

Compared to a cup of coffee, her drink seemed to have about 50% more caffeine. The taurine was around 1500mg; I don’t remember exactly.

I’m no one to give lifestyle advice, but I drink two pots of coffee per day. The caffeine content, therefore, did not give me pause. The taurine I’m much less familiar with, so did some preliminary research today.

Two sources I visited say that taurine, up to 3000mg per day, can be considered safe. (I assume that’s for an adult, of course.)

So, if one can contains over 1500mg taurine, then perhaps two cans per day is not suggested.

I’ll be talking more about taurine, caffeine, and energy drinks.

Source:

mayoclinic

myprotein

mycrazygoodlife.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.