English: what is a maven?

Self-tutoring about English: the tutor mentions maven, a word he’s long wondered about.

Here and there, I’ve seen the word maven over the years, but never knew what it meant. Finally I got the notion to look it up:

maven: one with expert knowledge on the subject in question.

Source:

Mish, Frederick C. (editor). The Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Springfield: Merriam-Webster, 2004.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English: two meanings of pavement

Tutoring English, a word’s true meaning might hold surprise. The tutor mentions pavement.

pavement: (noun)

  1. the material that a car travels on in an urban setting.

  2. a hard-surfaced way similar to 1., but alongside the road, for pedestrians only: the sidewalk. Such is the British point of view.

Source:

separatedbyacommonlanguage.blogspot.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English: what does dragoon mean?

Tutoring English, so many word discoveries happen. The tutor mentions dragoon.

dragoon (1. noun:military):

soldier on horseback; cavalry soldier.

dragoon (2. verb):

to cause someone to do something they would rather not, by manipulation or intimidation.

I’ve been known to dragoon my kids to practice the piano.

Source:

Barber, Katherine, et al (editors). Oxford Canadian Dictionary of Current English. Don Mills: Oxford University Press, 2005.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English, technology: what is a kludge?

Reading always means self-tutoring: the tutor shares a word he encountered.

kludge (noun):

an improvised solution, possibly unpromising, yet effective. Kludge is often used in the context of computer science.

Source:

www.collinsdictionary.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English: what is a klick?

Self-tutoring about English: the tutor shares a find.

Since I was a kid, I’ve heard people say, for instance, “45 klicks,” meaning 45 km. I’ve never suspected that, in that context, “klick” starts with a “k”.

Source:

Barber, Katherine et al. Oxford Canadian Dictionary of Current English. Don Mills: Oxford University Press, 2005.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English, philosophy: what does archaic mean to you?

via Daily Prompt: Archaic

Self-tutoring: the tutor reflects on an inexorable process.

Seeking a solid foundation, I look up archaic:

archaic:

1) ancient; 2) out-of-date.

-Collins Essential Canadian English Dictionary and Thesaurus, HarperCollins, 2006.

For the purpose herein, archaic’s second meaning – out-of-date – is the one I’m exploring.

For me, as a tutor, and as a parent, the word archaic defines a challenging philosophical boundary. The reason is simple: to me, truth never goes out-of-date. Yet, to society, truth has a shelf-life. Past its shelf-life, any truth becomes archaic, so people don’t respect it.

A person can have an archaic point of view without realizing. Such happened to me with the kids’ piano lessons. They had recitals and exams to prepare for, so I spurred them to practice. One of them argued that it didn’t interest him, so he shouldn’t have to.

I was shocked at the notion that not wanting to practice can remove its requirement. After all, if people only do what they want in this moment, the world as we know it will cease to exist within an hour.

Over time, I have realized that my point of view is archaic. Today, in this society, people don’t generally believe a kid should have to practice the piano if they don’t want to. That philosophy extends well beyond practicing the piano – and well beyond just kids.

Mentioning the fact that, failing to practice, the student may fall short at the recital and the exam, only sinks me deeper, since I’m expressing archaic reasoning. People don’t typically think of consequences in that way nowadays – at least, not around here.

My kid did practice the piano: it was a battle, but I won. It’s probably my last victory.

Nowadays, the concept of preparing for exams is being challenged as archaic – “How will this help me in life? In the real world, people work in groups – don’t you know?”

I’m becoming a marginal character. Academic learning – seeking understanding for the purpose of self-improvement – is outmoded in the world that surrounds me. It is, so I am, archaic – at age 48, I’m out-of-date:)

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English, religion: what is an avatar?

Self-tutoring: the tutor finds the definition of avatar.

avatar:

representation, on Earth, of a god or goddess, in human or animal form.

Source:

Gilmour, Lorna. Collins Essential Canadian English Dictionary & Thesaurus. Glasgow: HarperCollins, 2006.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English: what is a natatorium?

Tutoring English, obscure words can be fun. The tutor brings up natatorium.

natatorium

a swimming pool, particulary an indoor one.

Source:

Mish, Frederick C. (editor). The Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Springfield: Merriam-Webster, 2004.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English: sanatorium and sanitarium

Tutoring English, familiar words can hold surprises. The tutor mentions such a case with the words sanatorium and sanitarium.

I almost never hear sanatorium, but rather, sanitarium. They have the same meaning: a facility promoting patients’ recovery, possibly from long-term ailments.

Source:

Mish, Frederick C (editor). Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Springfield: Merriam-Webster, 2004.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English: what does derring-do mean?

Tutoring English, new vocabulary is always interesting. The tutor mentions derring-do.

derring-do (noun):

boldness; decisive bravery.

Jumping the mud puddle in his white suit was an act of derring-do.

Source:

Gilmour, Lorna (editor). Collins Essential Canadian English Dictionary and Thesaurus. Glasgow: HarperCollins, 2006.

w3schools.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.