English: the word notional

Tutoring English, I’m always looking for new words. The tutor brings up notional.

If a notion is an idea, then notional should relate somehow to one. In fact:

notional: existing only as an idea; imaginary

Notional can also describe someone who believes fantasy is real.

I’ve never heard the word used:)

Source:

The Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Springfield: Merriam-Webster, 2004.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English: inter (verb)

Playing Parker Brothers’ Boggle (1976) means constant English tutoring. The tutor shares one such case.

Last night, playing Boggle, my wife claimed inter. I thought it was a prefix, so not allowed. She looked it up. Of course she found

inter: to place in a tomb after death.

She kept inter for two points, but won by a much larger margin:)

Source:

Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Springfield: Merriam-Webster, 2004.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Calculator usage: finding final price after discount and tax with the HP-10B

Tutoring financial math, you might often use the HP-10B. The tutor shows how easily it can apply a discount then add tax to get the final price.

Example: Imagine a handbag is regular price $85 but is discounted by 20%. Assuming 12% sales tax, find final price using the HP-10B.

Solution:

  1. Key in 85
  2. Key in – 20 % =
  3. Key in + 12 % =

HTH:)

Source:

Hewlett-Packard HP-10B Business Calculator Owner’s Manual. Corvallis: Hewlett-Packard, 1994.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Calculator usage: markup on the HP-10B

Tutoring financial math, you might fall in love with a calculator. The tutor tells about markup on the HP-10B.

Example: Imagine you buy a product for $35, then want to apply a 25% markup. Find the tag price using the HP-10B.

Solution:

  1. Key in 35 then CST
  2. Key in 25 then the orange key then MAR
  3. Press PRC

HTH:)

Source:

Hewlett-Packard HP-10B Business Calculator Owner’s Manual. Corvallis: Hewlett-Packard, 1994.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Bird watching: horned lark?

Bird identification involves constant self-tutoring. The tutor describes a bird he saw, and attempts to identify it.

Yesterday’s sunny afternoon, I noticed something odd from the corner of my eye. I had no idea what it would be, just that it was different. I looked outside.

On the fence was a bird whose posture surprised me. I didn’t have my glasses, so quickly got them; the bird was still there. I didn’t recognize it.

The bird’s size was similar to a robin’s, but it didn’t stand like a robin. Its back was solid reddish brown, which petered into spots around whitish breast. I think it had a black collar. It had a white throat, some yellow (I think) near the eye, and a black circle below and behind its eye. Where the head wasn’t black, it was white or yellow.

A couple of times it flew to the lawn, then returned to the fence.

The birds I can find that look most like the one I saw: a juvenile robin or a horned lark. Conveniently, an adult male robin landed about six feet away on the same fence; it was the same size as the bird I’m describing. I don’t believe a juvenile robin, at this time of year, would be equal in size to an adult.

I heard the bird’s voice; it was producing single notes, around 10-15 seconds apart. That could be a horned lark or a robin.

I’ve read that horned larks aren’t necessarily known to breed here, but I’d say that’s what the bird was.

Source:

www.allaboutbirds.org

www.crd.bc.ca

www.allaboutbirds.org

Robbins, Bruun, et al. Birds of North America: a guide to field identification. New York: Golden Press, 1966.

Calculator usage: memory on the HP-10B

Tutoring financial math, you’ll likely encounter the capable HP-10B. The tutor tells how to use its user-accessible memory.

The HP-10B seems to have 11 dedicated places to store your own numbers. The locations are at 0 to 9, plus there is the M register.

Example: On the HP-10B, store the number 65.21 in register 5.

  1. Key in 65.21
  2. Press the orange key
  3. Press RCL
  4. Press 5

To retrieve the number,

  1. Press RCL
  2. Press 5

HTH:)

Source:

Hewlett-Packard Business Calculator HP-10B Owners Manual. Corvallis: Hewlett-Packard, 1994.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Calculator usage, statistics: the amazing Casio fx-991ES PLUS C

Tutoring math, you see all kinds of scientific calculators. The tutor continues to praise the Casio fx-991ES PLUS C.

If you were to be marooned on an island with a single calculator…which one would you prefer? The question is absurd, of course. Yet, I believe I know my answer: the Casio fx-991ES PLUS C. It has seemingly endless functionality for a little scientific calculator.

Today I noticed that it calculates binomial pdf.

Example: Using the Casio fx-991ES PLUS C, find the probability of 20 successes in 35 trials when p=0.44.

Solution:

  1. Press MODE, then arrow down
  2. Select 3
  3. Select 4
  4. For a single query, select 2
  5. It will ask for x (the number of successes). Key in 20 =
  6. Next, it will ask for N (the number of trials). Key in 35 =
  7. Now it will ask for p (the probability of success each time). Key in .44 =
  8. Hopefully you receive the answer 0.0401

HTH:)

Source:

Casio fx-991ES PLUS C User’s Guide

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Lifestyle: start of summer, 2017

Tutoring, you observe how people’s lifestyle and attitudes change along with the weather. The tutor reflects on the coming of summer, 2017.

To a Canadian, seasons may not begin according to the designated times on the calendar. In my January 26, 2015 post, I define the first day of spring from a Canadian point of view.

What about summer? Supposedly it starts around June 21 each year. However, from my point of view, the real start of summer is when people start behaving like it’s summer – when they start wearing summer clothes and engaging in summer activities.

By Friday, May 19, spring had clearly been here for around two months. The high that day was 16°C. However, Saturday morning, May 20, the sun was bursting through the windows. By 10am, standing on the deck outside, the feeling was summer, not spring. The high turned out to be 23°C. Sunday reached 23°C as well, Monday, 24°C.

By Monday, people were dressing and behaving in summer fashion. Adapting to summer doesn’t take long; today, the kids are heading to school in T-shirts (no jackets or hoodies) without hesitation.

From Saturday to Monday, people decided summer is here. On that observation, I’m defining the start of summer from a Canadian point of view: the first three consecutive days to top 20°C constitute the beginning of summer.

Enjoy your summer, whenever it arrives:)

Source:

theweathernetwork.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English: homonyms (or homophones): illicit vs elicit

Tutoring English, homophones continue to be a favourite topic. The tutor brings up the pair illicit and elicit.

elicit (verb): to provoke a response.

illicit (adj): illegal; non-permissible; purposely concealed (to avoid consequences).

The difference (depending on which dictionary you read) between homonym and homophone I mention in my Jan 2, 2015 post.

Source:

Barber, Katherine, et al. Oxford Canadian Dictionary of Current English. Don Mills: Oxford University Press, 2005.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English: what does moil mean?

Tutoring English, vocabulary expansion is important. The tutor brings up the word moil.

Today, during a family game of Boggle (Parker Brothers, 1976), I claimed the word moil on a hunch. It turned out, indeed, to be a word:

moil (verb): to perform hard labor

Source:

Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Springfield: Merriam-Webster, 2004.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.