What does feverfew look like?

Self-tutoring about plant identification: the tutor identifies the daisy-like plant growing in the backyard.

Identifying this one took some time, but I believe it’s feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium). The non-pointed, lobed leaves seem to be decisive, as many plants, apparently, have flowers like daisies.

Apparently feverfew can take hold pretty quickly, though it’s not native here. I’ve not seen it in the yard before, but numerous are present now.

Source:

wikipedia.org

www.seasonalwildflowers.com

Pojar, Jim and Andy MacKinnon. Plants of Coastal British Columbia. Vancouver: BC Ministry of Forests and Lone Pine Publishing, 1994.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Gooseberries: Ribes uva-crispa vs Ribes hirtellum

Self-tutoring about botany: the tutor wades into the distinctions between the European gooseberry and the American one.

Ribes uva-crispa is the old world gooseberry. Its berries can be an inch (2.5cm) across – its leaves, 6cm. However, its nodal spines typically max at less than a cm.

The gooseberry bush I’ve been observing has berries 1cm across, and leaves about 3cm. However, its nodal spines are easily over a cm long. It’s Ribes hirtellum, the American gooseberry.

Source:

gobotany.newenglandwild.org

gobotany.newenglandwild.org

wikipedia.org

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Are dandelions an invasive species?

Tutoring English, one is interested in definitions. The tutor examines the definition of invasive species in connection with the common dandelion.

The common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) is from Europe, rather than native to North America. Although it seems to be virtually everywhere, is it an invasive species? Perhaps not.

An invasive species is able to enter nature and displace native species. Yet, the dandelion grows in the human footprint. Some wonder if, truly, the dandelion lives in wild nature, outside of human influence. If not, it’s not invasive.

Source:

bangordailynews.com

Pojar, Jim and Andy MacKinnon. Plants of Coastal British Columbia. Vancouver: BC Ministry of Forests and Lone Pine Publishing, 1994.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Pearly everlasting

Identifying plants means constant self-tutoring. The tutor shares another find: pearly everlasting.

I know I’ve seen pearly everlasting elsewhere; it grows very commonly on the west coast. Yet, I’ve never thought to identify it.

The flowers really are pearly white, though the centres are darker. The leaves are long, thin, and lance-shaped, and may even gain in prominence as the stem ascends. The blossoms are many, and can last a long time.

Source:

Pojar, Jim and Andy MacKinnon. Plants of Coastal British Columbia. Vancouver: BC Ministry of Forests and Lone Pine Publishing, 1994.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Yard work: backyard spider identification: thinlegged wolf spider

Self-tutoring about a spider I see in the yard: the tutor shares a find.

Lately I’ve seen numerous spiders with black legs and head but white abdomen. “What kind of spider are they?” I wondered.

Today I looked them up: apparently they are female thinlegged wolf spiders. The white abdomen is not part of the body, but rather an egg sac the female is carrying.

As I understand, being wolfers, these spiders hunt, rather than living in webs. I see them wandering, which makes sense.

Here’s a pic of one:

Source:

web.pdx.edu

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Plant identification from field guide: mayweed

Self-tutoring about plants I notice: the tutor shares a recent find.

I think this is mayweed; I noticed it as I crossed a field.

What caught my eye was the flowers – specifically, their large yellow centres surrounded by white petals that are small, compared to what a daisy might have. Moreover, the yellow centre is conical rather than flat; it’s much deeper than a daisy’s.

Mayweed grows on disturbed sites, and one assumes it flowers in May. Although I didn’t have time to revisit it, guide in hand, I believe the identification.

Source:

Pojar, Jim and Andy MacKinnon. Plants of Coastal British Columbia. Vancouver: Lone Pine Publishing and BC Ministry of Forests, 1994.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Biology: pH range of blood

Tutoring biology, as well as hearing new ideas about nutrition, might lead to the topic of blood pH.

On the pH scale, 7 is neutral, below 7, acid, and above 7, alkaline (or base).

Human blood pH range, for health, is between 7.35 and 7.45. For survival, it’s between 6.8 and 7.8, according to conventional wisdom.

Source:

acutecaretesting.org

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Biology: what mineral form of calcium is found in bones?

Tutoring biology, the question about calcium in bone – specifically, which mineral form it takes – might arise. The tutor discusses it.

The hardness of bone comes from the presence of hydroxyapatite:

hydroxyapatite:

Ca5(PO4)3OH

found in bones and giving them their hardness.

Source:

answersingenesis.org

www.iofbonehealth.org

www.fluidnova.com

www.w3schools.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Biology, nursing: what is blood serum, vs blood plasma?

Tutoring biology, you might be asked about blood serum and/or blood plasma. The tutor mentions a distinction.

In yesterday’s post I give an explanation of blood plasma: it’s blood minus the red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Some people might see it as the liquid that carries the blood cells and platelets.

Blood serum is related, but has a specific difference from plasma:

blood serum:

plasma after fibrinogen has been removed from it.

Fibrinogen is a protein that weaves the physical blood clot.

Source:

Mader, Sylvia S. Inquiry into Life, 9th ed. Toronto: McGraw-Hill, 2000.

www.w3schools.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.