What is a tank town?

Tutoring English, discoveries are continuous. The tutor brings up the term tank town.

tank town (noun):
a small town, not distinguished.

Apparently, the phrase comes from the steam locomotive era, when a train would stop at a town to refill its boiler.

Source:

Mish, Frederick C (editor). The Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Springfield: Merriam-Webster, 2004.

www.collinsdictionary.com

Make-do vs make do

Tutoring English, subtleties are always interesting. The tutor mentions the distinction between “make-do” and “make do.”

make-do (adj): improvised.

make do (verb): get by with less resources than might be typical for the context.

Source:

Mish, Frederick C (editor). The Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Springfield: Merriam-Webster, 2004.

Gilmour, Lorna (editor). Collins Essential Canadian English Dictionary and Thesaurus. Glasgow: HarperCollins, 2006.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Homonyms: filter and philter

Tutoring English, homonyms are a favourite topic of mine. The tutor mentions the pair filter and philter.

A filter is a porous barrier to separate solids from liquid; a philtre is a magic potion – often, specifically, a love potion.

“Philtre” can also be spelled “philter.”

Source:

Gilmour, Lorna (editor). Collins Essential Canadian English Dictionary & Thesaurus. Glasgow: HarperCollins, 2006.

Mish, Frederick C. (editor). Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Springfield: Merriam-Webster, 2004.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

What does apposite mean?

Tutoring English, vocabulary is always interesting. The tutor mentions the word apposite.

apposite adj: cleverly chosen for the situation.

The meal of cold-cut sandwiches was apposite, given the hot weather.

Source:

Barber, Katherine et al. Oxford Canadian Dictionary of Current English. Don Mills: Oxford University Press, 2005.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Mead vs meed: homonyms

Tutoring English, homonyms always interest. The tutor mentions the pair mead and meed.

mead: alcoholic drink made from fermented honey.

meed: deserved compensation.

Source:

Barber, Katherine et al. Oxford Canadian Dictionary of Current English. Don Mills: Oxford University Press, 2005.

www.merriam-webster.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English: what is a maven?

Self-tutoring about English: the tutor mentions maven, a word he’s long wondered about.

Here and there, I’ve seen the word maven over the years, but never knew what it meant. Finally I got the notion to look it up:

maven: one with expert knowledge on the subject in question.

Source:

Mish, Frederick C. (editor). The Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Springfield: Merriam-Webster, 2004.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English: two meanings of pavement

Tutoring English, a word’s true meaning might hold surprise. The tutor mentions pavement.

pavement: (noun)

  1. the material that a car travels on in an urban setting.

  2. a hard-surfaced way similar to 1., but alongside the road, for pedestrians only: the sidewalk. Such is the British point of view.

Source:

separatedbyacommonlanguage.blogspot.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English: what does dragoon mean?

Tutoring English, so many word discoveries happen. The tutor mentions dragoon.

dragoon (1. noun:military):

soldier on horseback; cavalry soldier.

dragoon (2. verb):

to cause someone to do something they would rather not, by manipulation or intimidation.

I’ve been known to dragoon my kids to practice the piano.

Source:

Barber, Katherine, et al (editors). Oxford Canadian Dictionary of Current English. Don Mills: Oxford University Press, 2005.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English, technology: what is a kludge?

Reading always means self-tutoring: the tutor shares a word he encountered.

kludge (noun):

an improvised solution, possibly unpromising, yet effective. Kludge is often used in the context of computer science.

Source:

www.collinsdictionary.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English: what is a klick?

Self-tutoring about English: the tutor shares a find.

Since I was a kid, I’ve heard people say, for instance, “45 klicks,” meaning 45 km. I’ve never suspected that, in that context, “klick” starts with a “k”.

Source:

Barber, Katherine et al. Oxford Canadian Dictionary of Current English. Don Mills: Oxford University Press, 2005.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.