Using the McAfee shredder, part 0: possible time it can take

Self-tutoring about home computer use: the tutor talks about using the McAfee shredder.

Lately I’ve been using the shredder on McAfee Internet Security. For small files it can be very fast.

This morning I used it on a file approximately 2GBytes. It took, I’d say, a half hour anyway. For a long time its progress reported an unchanging 50%. However, it finished around 10 minutes later. I guess its progress wasn’t updating during that period.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

New pop-up: “Your McAfee subscription has expired….”

More home computer self-tutoring: the tutor shares about another pop-up.

While working on the laptop today, I noticed a browser tab I didn’t recognize. I had many open and was pre-occupied, so didn’t check it right away. Eventually I did, to read as follows:

Windows Security Center: Your McAfee subscription has expired today….

I know, by now, that just because a message says it’s from Windows, doesn’t mean it is. I check the McAfee app: it says the subscription is Active. Next I check McAfee’s site report for the actual webpage:

Website Status: Unknown. We have to dig a litter deeper….

If McAfee itself doesn’t know about the expiration notice, supposedly for its own product, I figure the notice must be bogus. Next I check the web address of the pop-up:

antivirus-renewal.mcafee.com.abouttwentylettersandnumbers.trade/…..

The website appears, at first, to be from mcafee.com, but it’s actually from a .trade domain.

.trade is, apparently, a new top level domain.

Anyway, about the pop-up: I’ll just close the tab.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

The “Your Windows is infected with 3 viruses” pop-up

Home computer self-tutoring: the tutor shares a sudden experience from last night.

Yesterday evening I was surfing the ‘net when suddenly a pop-up appeared with a beep. Rather alarmingly, it presented me the message that “your Windows is infected with 3 viruses”, or some such news.

I had McAfee running its real-time scanning, so I opened up the Security Centre to check if I truly was under menace. McAfee reported its familiar green message “Your computer is secure.”

I searched the pop-up’s words “your Windows is infected with 3 viruses” and found it listed as a false alarm. The advice I read:

  1. Ignore the “your Windows is infected with 3 viruses” message, and all other suggestions in the pop-up.
  2. Close the tab containing the pop-up.
  3. If the website refuses to close, restart the browser or even restart the computer if needed.

I had closed the “your Windows is infected with 3 viruses” tab seconds after it opened: I was sure it was not to be trusted. After finding out about it, I set McAfee on a full-system scan, which found nothing.

Source:

www.pcrisk.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Microsoft web browser: how to tell which you’re using

Computer self-tutoring: the tutor mentions how to check which Microsoft browser you’re using.

In my experience, here is how to reveal the About info:

The three dots at top right, just under the x, hold a menu, under which, at the bottom, is Settings.

Opening the Settings option, a heading called About this app is near the bottom. There is described the browser: this one reports Microsoft Edge.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Home computer use: restart fix for sound problem

Self-tutoring about home computer use: the tutor mentions how a restart fixed a sound problem.

Over a week the sound from the main computer deteriorated. At the end it still wasn’t bad, but definitely noticeable. The kids wanted something done.

I went into the device manager – none of the sound devices was reporting a problem. I hooked another computer to the speakers; they sounded fine when it played through them. I wondered what the problem was.

Confounded, I turned off the computer and left it off for about 10 minutes, then restarted. Since then the sound is fine.

Source:

lifehacker.com

www.techwalla.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Spreadsheets: Excel: how to write text across multiple columns

Self-tutoring with Excel: the tutor shares a tip about extending text over multiple columns.

Let’s imagine you want to title a spreadsheet. You probably want to center the title at the top: likely it will run across more than one column, especially if the title font is larger than inside the sheet.

Here’s how I found to do so:

  1. Select the row across the top.
  2. Right-click the selection, then choose Format Cells.
  3. Choose the Alignment tab.
  4. Under Horizontal, click the dropdown menu to reveal Center Across Selection.
  5. Click Center Across Selection, then OK.

Source:

answers.microsoft.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Home computer use: shortcut key combinations: refreshing the page in the browser, Windows

More self-tutoring: the tutor mentions a shortcut to refresh the page in a browser.

Ctrl+F5

is meant to refresh the page in the browser. As I understand, the reload is from the server rather than from the cache.

Source:

www.getfilecloud.com

support.mozilla.org

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Web browsers, home computer use: setting the cursor in the search bar w/o using the mouse

Self-tutoring about home computer use: the tutor shares a keyboard shortcut to the search bar.

Ctrl+L
is meant to return the cursor to the search bar.

Source:

w3schools.com

lifehacker.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Computer skills: a search tip

For me, search skills lead to constant self-tutoring. The tutor shares a technique he’s noticed.

“word” ≠ “word ”

Searching my posts for the word fire, I got many results in which it was part of a word – Firefox and fireweed, for two examples. Yet, I wanted to find instances of just fire, but itself.

I wondered if typing in “fire ” instead of “fire” would change the results to give only those where fire stands alone.

What do you know – it worked:)

Source:

w3schools.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Windows, home computer use: command prompt file operations: xcopy

Maintaining a home computer requires frequent self-tutoring. The tutor shares.

This Windows 7 computer no longer performs the COPY command from the mouse, so I use the command prompt to copy files, etc.

Lately I’ve been backing up directories, which contain subdirectories and so on. (Directory can also be thought of as Folder.)

To copy an entire directory, including its subdirectories and the folders contained therein, I use the xcopy command:

xcopy source_directory destination_directory /e

or

xcopy source_directory destination_directory /s

With /e it copies the empty folders, but not with /s.

In my experience, assigning a destination directory is important, since xcopy doesn’t copy the enclosing directory itself, just its contents. So, for instance, if you want to copy the directory desktop0 to a backup called desktop0, you might key

xcopy the_source_path\desktop0 the_destination_path\desktop0 /e

Observations:

  1. Although you can use the forward slash to navigate in Windows, it can’t (in my experience) be used in paths in Windows commands. Rather, the backslash must be. For instance, topdir\dir1\dir2 must be used, rather than topdir/dir1/dir2, within a file command such as xcopy. However, for switches such as /s or /e, the forward slash is used.
  2. You can’t use xcopy from within a directory you’re telling it to copy. I typically do it from the one above.

Source:

www.lifewire.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.