What is clarified butter, and what is ghee?

Self-tutoring about cooking: the tutor arrives at the definitions of clarified butter and ghee.

Clarified butter and ghee are not the same but can be explained as follows:

  1. Clarified butter is begun by heating butter at low heat so that it melts.
  2. As the butter melts, solids will sink to the bottom and a foam will form on top.
  3. The clarified butter is just the liquid without the foam or solids.
  4. If the butter is heated for longer, the liquid will deepen in color and the foam will solidify and sink. Then, the liquid is ghee.

Source:

www.thekitchn.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

A rub for chicken legs

Self-tutoring about cooking: the tutor shares a find.

I searched up a rub to elevate some chicken legs on the barbecue and found this one from Brenda McGrath at allrecipes.com, a site I often visit for recipes.

I rubbed the chicken legs in it, then indirect-grilled them on the barbecue at medium-high heat for about 80 minutes.

One of my kids commented that the chicken legs tasted “like barbecue chips.” Everyone loved the rub. Thanks, Brenda!

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Lifestyle, cooking: the different types of oats

More lifestyle self-tutoring: the tutor explains the three classifications of oats you might normally hear about.

  1. Groats: kernels from oat plants. They’ve had the outer, inedible husk removed.
  2. Steel-cut oats: groats that have been cut into two or three pieces by a steel blade.
  3. Rolled oats: oat kernels first steamed, then pressed flat under rollers.

Source:

wholegrainscouncil.org

www.livestrong.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Lifestyle, cooking: what is parboiled rice?

For me, learning to cook means constant self-tutoring. The tutor shares what he discovered about parboiled rice.

Parboiled rice
When rice is harvested, each grain is inside a protective, inedible hull. During parboiling, the rice is steamed while still inside the hull, and nutrients dissolve from the hull into the rice grain.

Moreover, parboiled rice, when cooked, has grains less sticky, but rather more distinct, than has non-parboiled rice.

Parboiled rice is also called converted rice.

Source:

www.usarice.de

www.livestrong.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Lifestyle: cooking: what is freezer temperature meant to be?

Lifestyle, for me, leads to endless self-tutoring. The tutor shares the answer to a question he’s often wondered.

ideal freezer temperature

Freezer temperature is meant to be -18C or below (0F or below).

Apparently, food stored at -18C will remain safe to eat, although it may eventually lose its tastiness, depending on the duration.

Source:

www.fda.gov

www.thekitchn.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Lifestyle, cooking: microwave cooking: standing time

Still more lifestyle tutoring evolves as the tutor researches cooking with the microwave.

Standing time:

similar to resting time, it’s a period food is left alone after being cooked in the microwave.

The microwave targets some food molecules – water, for instance – preferentially. They absorb energy during microwave cooking. After removal from the microwave, that energy can transfer to surrounding food molecules, causing the portion to heat up. Therefore, the temperature of the portion can rise during standing time.

Source:
www.fsis.usda.gov

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Lifestyle, cooking: can you use wax paper in the microwave?

More lifestyle self-tutoring: the tutor researches if wax paper can safely be used in the microwave.

This week, I’m out of town, living in a hotel room that has a microwave oven. I don’t have any plates, bowls, etc.

I wondered if I could heat a sausage roll wrapped in wax paper, so I researched the situation:

Apparently, wax paper can safely be used in the microwave.

Source:

www.fsis.usda.gov

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Lifestyle, cooking: meat preservation: what does cure mean?

More lifestyle tutoring: the tutor researches the definition of cure in the context of meat preservation.

cure (verb):
to preserve, and hopefully enhance the flavour and perhaps the colour of, meat. When curing, any combination of salt, sugar, nitrite and/or nitrate might be used.

Source:

National Center for Home Food Preservation

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Lifestyle: cooking: substitute for baking powder

For me, learning to cook means constant self-tutoring. The tutor tells of a substitute he used, successfully, for baking power.

Last night, I planned “breakfast for dinner”: pancakes. However, the recipe I wanted to use calls for two teaspoons baking powder; at best I had only one left. My wife said the store was crazy busy, so I had to improvise.

I surfed to healthline.com, where I learned of ten possible substitutes for baking powder. I chose to use 1/4 tsp baking soda plus 1/2 tsp vinegar.

I added the baking soda to the dry ingredients, then, at the last instant, added the vinegar to the mix of egg, milk and oil. Next I mixed the wet and dry ingredients as indicated (making a well in the dry, pouring the wet in).

I was afraid the pancakes might taste of vinegar, but even my wife says they’re fine. No one complained.

Source:

allrecipes.com

healthline.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Lifestyle: food wrap: wax paper vs aluminum foil

More lifestyle self-tutoring: the tutor makes a preliminary comparison between wax paper and aluminum foil.

We’ve always used wax paper to wrap sandwiches, but a couple of weeks back we ran out. The only alternative on hand was aluminum foil, so I used it.

Aluminum foil I find easier to work with than wax paper, since it has a stronger memory. After wrapping the sandwiches I wondered if I could always just use aluminum foil from then on.

Apparently, aluminum foil and wax paper can be gotten for around the same price. So, if you like aluminum foil better for wrapping your sandwiches, it’s a viable alternative to wax paper.

Source:

www.walmart.ca

www.walmart.ca

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.