Canadian geography: Vancouver Island fauna: are there coyotes here?

Self-tutoring about animals on Vancouver Island: the tutor checks if coyotes live here.

Apparently, coyotes do not reside on Vancouver Island.

Source:

spca.bc.ca

sierraclub.bc.ca

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Health: bursitis

Self-tutoring about joint health: the tutor does some research about bursitis.

I mention in my post from Aug. 15 I’ve been nursing a shoulder injury. It may have happened around Aug. 7

I’m told the X-ray suggests bursitis, tendinitis, and calcification. Am I to be congratulated for managing all three conditions simultaneously? Perhaps…anyway, the shoulder is much better today than a week ago.

I looked into bursitis this evening for what to expect. A few details seem important:

  1. Typically, rest really helps bursitis. Such has been my case.
  2. Bursitis can result from a traumatic injury, but is often connected with long-term stress on the joint, possibly from sports, for example.
  3. The pain may be worse at night. Definitely, such was my case. It doesn’t hurt anymore, but for a few days it hurt intensely, and worst at night.
  4. If bursitis is not associated with an infection, with proper care it may heal in a few weeks. Once again, my shoulder has much improved in the two weeks since symptoms appeared.
  5. BTW: In my case, during the first few days after the injury, neither ibuprofen nor acetaminophen could touch the pain. The only pain relief I managed was from ice packs. I also have tendinitis and calcification; perhaps that’s why. However, the pain’s been gone for many days now.

Source:

medicalnewstoday.com

medicalnewstoday.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Canadian geography: Acadian forest: eastern white cedar

Self-tutoring about the Acadian forest: the tutor mentions eastern white cedar.

Eastern white cedar typically grows 40 to 50 ft tall (12 to 15m). It reminds one of the cedars we have here on the West Coast, just much smaller.

I can’t recall seeing eastern white cedar in Nova Scotia or PEI when I lived there, although the range map tells me they do inhabit both provinces, and even the specific places I lived. However, I easily spotted them along the highway in New Brunswick and Maine.

Should I return to Nova Scotia or PEI, I will try to find eastern white cedar there.

Source:

Natural Resources Canada

macphailwoods.org

novascotia.ca

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Canadian geography: Prince Edward Island, part 1

Self-tutoring about Canadian geography: the tutor researches and reminisces….

I lived in PEI from ’76 to ’80. It’s a unique place, famous for potatoes, lobster, and its red soil. I saw lots of all three when I lived there as a child.

There are no mountains in PEI; its highest point is 459 feet (140m). The land isn’t necessarily flat; it’s gently rolling, you might say. I recall, on my bike as a kid, riding up hills that seemed pretty steep, and long.

PEI has the highest population density of any province in Canada, yet the smallest total population. Its biggest city is Charlottetown, with about 36000 residents. The island total is about 143000.

PEI’s population might have been around 120000 when I left (1980), so it’s grown by around 20% since then. During that same period, Canada’s population has grown from 24 million to about 37.5 million, which is an increase of 56%.

I hope to discuss PEI more in future posts:)

Source:

peakbagger.com

worldatlas.com

gov.pe.ca

tradingeconomics.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Pain relief, part II: NSAIDS: why they can affect the stomach

Self-tutoring about pain relief: the tutor looks into the connection between NSAIDS and the stomach.

Apparently, NSAIDS work by reducing the production of prostaglandins, which are chemicals the body makes in response to injury. Prostaglandins cause fever and inflammation, along with pain.

Prostaglandins also are released to maintain the stomach lining. NSAIDS, by reducing prostagladins, reduce the protection to the stomach lining.

Common NSAIDS are aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen.

Source:

rxlist.com

yourhormones.info

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Politics: the Trump presidency, part 1

Self-tutoring about US politics: the tutor reflects about the Trump presidency.

With unemployment and crime very low, why are some voters seemingly unhappy with Trump?

Donald Trump is not a politician: he doesn’t just say what people want to hear. Rightly or wrongly, I think he’s in the habit of saying what he believes true, regardless of whom he might displease.

In the 70s, most people, I recall, were more likely to say what they thought without filtering it. Today, almost everyone’s a politician.

People can say all the right words, yet leave problems unhelped. Perhaps America is fortunate to have the problem it does – a president who’s less political, but who brings low crime and low unemployment.

Have a good weekend:)

Source:

www.whitehouse.gov

www.pewresearch.org

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Health: medical care in CR

Self-tutoring about health care in Campbell River: the tutor shares….

Typically, years pass between my visits to any health care facility. Occasionally, however, a health problem is too big for me. Such is the case with my injured shoulder.

Today, the GP referred me for an X-Ray. Leaving her office at around 16:15 for Medical Imaging (at the new hospital), my wife wondered if we could get the X-Ray done, too. They squeezed us in.

Every health care provider I met with today was welcoming and helpful; most went beyond my expectations in providing care. I’m impressed and want to express my gratitude.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English: what is a haversack?

Self-tutoring about English: the tutor mentions a find.

Haversack: a one-shouldered carry bag.

Source:

Mish, Frederick C. The Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Springfield: Merriam-Webster, 2004.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Philosophy: likelihood

Self-tutoring about possibilities: the tutor mentions an idea for contemplation.

Today, in the car, a song from around 2005 came on. It’s not one I like, and even if it was a hit, that was 14 years ago. It comes on the radio…rarely.

We parked and entered a waiting room for an appointment. After about five minutes, the same song began.

What likelihood attends that coincidence? I’d say it’s more remote than many events we imagine “impossible.” One might wonder how commonly such impossibilities actually occur.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Home computer use: application key aka menu key

Self-tutoring about computer use: the tutor mentions an observation.

This morning I noticed a key between the right Ctrl key and the right Windows key. It has a little arrow pointing among some lines. What is it?

Apparently the key is known as the menu key or application key. It seems to do what right click does.

Source:

gnome.org

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.
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