Windows: folder date modified not as recent as that of contained file

Self-tutoring about Windows: the tutor mentions a recent, perhaps surprising, find.

I thought that, when you modify a file, its containing folder is modified as well.

Apparently, a file can be modified without changing the “date modified” of its containing folder. I assure you I’m as surprised as anyone. Yet, I not only have my own experience; another source gives a similar report.

I’m using Windows 7; the other source references Windows 10.

Curious, eh?

Source:

stackoverflow.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Computer science: when a relative path stops working

Self-tutoring about computer science: the tutor shares a recent discovery.

I’ve been using a directory structure in a new context that doesn’t seem to recognize relative paths. For instance, let’s imagine the directory structure

From dir3, the link

./the_file.txt

used to lead to the_file.txt. Yet now, it doesn’t.

So now, /dir0/dir3/the_file.txt is needed to access the_file.txt in dir3.

HTH:)

unix.stackexchange.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

History: what does GI stand for in GI Joe?

Self-tutoring about pop culture and history: the tutor researches another question he’s often wondered about.

GI: galvanized iron, apparently. With time, it took on a broader meaning, eventually referring even to recruits.

BTW: not all sources seem to agree about the meaning of GI.

Source:

funtrivia.com

internationalskeptics.com

definitions.net

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Driving: can you turn left across a double solid yellow line?

Self-tutoring about driving: the tutor inquires about turning left across a double solid yellow line.

I’ve always thought it was illegal to cross a double solid yellow line. Therefore, if, along a double solid yellow line, I wanted to turn left into a destination, I would continue past until I could turn off the road, then return and enter the destination from the right.

Yet, my reading today suggests you can turn left across a double solid yellow line, if you are leaving or entering the road. Therefore, turning left across a double solid yellow line is permitted to turn into a driveway, for instance.

While making such a turn, however, the driver is under extra obligation to ensure its safety.

Such is my new understanding. There are source links below whence anyone can make their interpretation:)

Source:

bc-injury-law.com

www.bclaws.ca in partcular, 155 & 156

www.drivesmartbc.ca

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Philosophy: the judo belt: lost and found

Self-tutoring about perspective: the tutor shares a story.

When I attend judo workouts by myself, I walk there. This time of year, I often can’t wear the judo gi on the walk to the club, lest it gets muddy. Therefore, I wear ordinary clothes, bring the gi, and change at the club. The gi is bulky and heavy to carry.

Last night I packed the judo gi, along with a donation for a Christmas event, and started off. At the club, when I put on the gi, its belt was missing. In disbelief, I checked if it was hiding amongst my clothes, or had fallen from the bag and lay under the bleachers, etc. After two minutes I had to admit defeat: I couldn’t find it. Nevertheless, the workout was starting, so I borrowed a belt and hit the mats.

Throughout the evening I wondered where the belt must be. I concluded it was lying out somewhere along my route to the club. I suspected it would be very close to the club, perhaps even just outside the door.

When the workout ended, I hung up the borrowed belt, changed into my clothes, repacked the gi and left. My lost belt wasn’t on the club steps, nor in the parking lot. I wondered if it would be along either curb where I’d crossed the street; arriving there, I didn’t see it.

Next I headed along a well-lit, paved path. I didn’t expect to find the belt there, nor did I. After that, I entered a dark field, trying to retrace my steps.

Two thirds across the field, I turned back around to survey it: had I missed my earlier course, and passed the belt without noticing? Indeed, I had: about 25 feet away it lay, stretched almost straight. Apparently one end had tumbled from the bag and pulled the rest out behind it. In the dark, its color couldn’t be seen, but just its shape. I walked up and fetched it, relieved.

I wasn’t happy just because I’d found the belt. The confirmation that I’d dropped it along the walk, so could retrace my steps and recover it, is reassuring. Simple logic like that should work, even though in our complex lifestyle nowadays, it seems often not to.

Possibly, people saw the belt, but left it. I thank them for letting it be so I could return to find it:)

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Dawn redwood, part III: winter mode

Self-tutoring about local trees: the tutor makes another observation about local dawn redwoods.

I wrote a few posts about local dawn redwoods, the most recent here. It will lead interested readers back to earlier ones.

Dawn redwood is deciduous here. The dawn redwoods I earlier described are losing, or else have lost, much of their foliage. Their cones remain, hanging rather like acorns, but light-green and about half the size. Their flesh has a twisted look. Without the needles, the cones are quite noticeable.

The source link below has a great picture of dawn redwood cones.

Source:

www.treeworcester.org

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Computer science: Perl regex: grouping with parentheses

Self-tutoring about computer science: the tutor mentions using parentheses in Perl regular expressions to form groups.

A useful feature of regular expressions is the optional use of parentheses. There are numerous reasons to use them, but one is to report parts of the match.

Consider the following:

$strng=”Hehe_12345_68d-910″;

if($strng=~m/(hehe(_[\d]+_)([\d]+d)(-[d]+))/i){

print “$1\n$2\n$3\n$4\n”;

}
else{

print “no match”;
}

The output would be (assuming no typos:)

Hehe_12345_68d-910
_12345_
68d
-910

$1 denotes the contents of the first set of parentheses in the matching pattern, $2 the second, and so on. The groupings can be used to organize the output from the match.

Source:

perldoc.perl.org

roberts perl tutorial

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English: The Rocky Horror Picture Show

Tutoring English, you deal with theme and mood. The tutor reflects on The Rocky Horror Picture Show.

Back on October 27 I attended the Rocky Horror Picture Show, presented at the Tidemark Theatre by Isolde and Peach. Of course it was fantastic, with so much energy and pageantry.

During my third viewing of the Rocky Horror Picture Show, I realized how sad the story is: once the protagonist kills Eddie, the movie turns dark and sorrowful as he struggles to find refuge from what he’s done. In the end, even his servants turn on him.

The spectacular beauty showcased in the first part of Rocky Horror Picture Show is what we all love to contemplate. However, its theme seems to be that beauty, out of context, is doomed.

Nevertheless, drawn by the costumes and the crowd’s fantastic energy, I plan to continue attending The Rocky Horror Picture Show:)

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English: moot, the verb

Tutoring English, words can surprise. The tutor mentions the verb moot.

moot (verb):
to propose for discussion, or to actively discuss from different points of view.

Source:

Mish, Frederick C. (editor). The Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Springfield: Merriam-Webster, 2004.

Gilmour, Lorna (editor). Collins Essential Canadian English Dictionary and Thesaurus. Glasgow: HarperCollins, 2006.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English: what does forsooth mean?

Tutoring English, you occasionally see words from older times. The tutor mentions forsooth.

forsooth (adv):
truly.

Source:

Mish, Frederick C. (editor). The Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Springfield: Merriam-Webster, 2004.

Gilmour, Lorna (editor). Collins Essential Canadian English Dictionary and Thesaurus. Glasgow: HarperCollins, 2006.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.