Calculator usage: scientific notation and float notation on the amazing Staples BD-6108 Scientific Calculator

Tutoring high school math, calculators are always interesting. The tutor mentions a new favourite: the Staples BD-6108 Scientific Calculator.

Toggling between float (aka ‘normal’) display vs scientific notation, the Staples BD-6108 Scientific Calculator delivers.

Let’s imagine you want to convert 0.000297 to scientific notation. Here’s how, on the Staples BD-6108:

  1. First, key MODE then 1, which is the mode for everyday decimal calculations.
  2. Next, key 0.000297, then press =
  3. Press INV then the decimal point (which has SCI written above).
  4. To toggle back to normal (FLOAT) notation, just press INV then 0 (which has FLO written above).

HTH:)

Source:

BD-6108 Owner’s Manual.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Lifestyle: garter snake in the garden

Self-tutoring about garter snakes and gardening: the tutor shares about garter snakes.

Until 2012, I used to see snakes fairly often in the yard. Since, I’ve wondered where they’ve gone. After all, reptiles are sensitive creatures whose presence usually suggests environmental health. Furthermore, to my knowledge, we have no poisonous snakes on Vancouver Island. Therefore, a snake here is never a worry:)

A couple weeks back, I finally encountered a garter snake in the garden, to my relief. Maybe they’ve been here all along, but hiding? Perhaps we’ve just been missing each other. Anyway, there it was, alarmed at first, but soon much less timid.

The snake might have been 45cm, brown with red stripes down its sides; I suspect it to be northwestern garter snake.

I decided to research what benefits, etc, accompany snake presence in the garden. Apparently they eat anything they can – rodents (which would have to be very small for the snake I saw), grasshoppers, slugs, etc. Early last evening I observed slugs emerging: I hope that snake is taking notice:)

Source:

www.bcreptiles.ca

learn.eartheasy.com

ahealthylifeforme.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Homonyms: cue and queue

Tutoring English, homonyms are always interesting. The tutor mentions the pair cue and queue.

cue (noun):
signal to act or how to behave.

queue (noun):
line-up of individuals waiting their turn for service, entry, or exit.

Source:

Barber, Katherine et al. Oxford Canadian Dictionary of Current English. Don Mills: Oxford University Press, 2005.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Homonyms: high and hie

Tutoring English, homonyms are always interesting. The tutor mentions the pair high and hie.

I imagine everyone knows what high means.

hie (verb):

hurry or hasten.

Source:

Gilmour, Lorna (editor). Collins Essential Canadian English Dictionary and Thesaurus. Glasgow: HarperCollins Publishers, 2006.

Mish, Frederick C. (editor). The Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Springfield: Merriam-Webster, 2004.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Roaming range of domestic cats

Self-tutoring about domestic cats: the tutor researches how far cats commonly roam.

We have no pets, but other people’s cats visit our yard daily. There is rotation: some are new arrivals, while others have come for years. Some only come at night. Doubtless we never see some.

I wondered: From how far away might these cats come?

Checking around, I found some numbers. Assuming a circular range, a typical house cat might wander around 80m from home. A feral cat, on the other hand, might range as far as 1.3km from its base.

Interesting, eh?

Source:

news.illinois.edu

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Metric system: how big is a hectare?

Tutoring science, the metric system may arise. The tutor mentions the definition of a hectare.

hectare (noun):

a square unit spanning 10000m2.

A hectare can be pictured an as area 100m wide by 100m long.

Another way to imagine a hectare is that it’s 2.47 acres.

Perhaps my favourite way to relate a hectare is that the grassy area enclosed by a school track (400m) is 1.12 hectares.

Source:

www.kelownanow.com

www.thecalculatorsite.com

www.metric-conversions.org

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Composting: putting rhubarb leaves in the compost

Self-tutoring about composting: the tutor shares a find about composting rhubarb leaves.

Rhubarb leaves are poisonous. Yet, can they be composted? The other day I noticed someone advising not to.

I had assumed rhubarb leaves are compostable, and I’ve found several sources that agree.

Source:

laidbackgardener.blog

www.sciencefocus.com

www.gardeningknowhow.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English: career, the verb

Tutoring English, words used in surprising ways are always interesting. The tutor mentions career, the verb.

career (verb):
travel in a seemingly uncontrolled manner at high speed.

Source:

Barber, Katherine et al. Oxford Canadian Dictionary of Current English. Don Mills: Oxford University Press, 2005.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Canadian Geography: Sable Island, Part 0

Self-tutoring about Canadian geography: the tutor begins about a famous, yet remote, part of his home province.

Sable Island, from the French sable, meaning sand, is a connected arc of sand dunes that form an island about 175 km off the coast of Nova Scotia.

The Island might have a crew of five; to my knowledge, all are staff of various government agencies. The runway is the beach.

A few hundred horses roam wild on Sable Island, protected from human interference since 1960 by Prime Minister John Diefenbaker.

The Island is about 42km long, and up to 1.5km wide, but its dimensions change as the dunes shift. Miraculously, there are freshwater ponds on it whence the horses drink.

I hope to mention more about Sable Island in future posts:)

Source:

wikipedia

Land and Sea: Sable Island

Rick Mercer Reports

www.cbc.ca

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Computer problem: it seemed serious, until I disconnected a device.

Self-tutoring about home computer use: the tutor gives an update of his experience in home computing.

The main computer we use, a Windows 7 desktop from 2010, had been struggling a couple of weeks. I mentioned about starting it in safe mode, then running a virus scan. The scan was clean.

Yet, the computer struggled more and more, running fast, shutting down unexpectedly and such. Yesterday morning, it simply wouldn’t boot, not even in safe mode. Was it dying?

I disconnected an old headset (headphones with microphone) plugged into it a couple of weeks back. After that, I turned the computer on. It started perfectly, like nothing was ever wrong. I’m writing from it now.

In one of the diagnostic screens it had mentioned that, if a camera or AV device had recently been connected, to remove it. That’s where I got the idea to disconnect the headset. Good advice, eh?

HTH:)

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.