Perl: greedy vs lazy match

Perl tutoring: the tutor compares a greedy match with its corresponding lazy one.

argumentgreedylazy
e2ee9a/e\w*\d//e\w*?\d/
matche2ee9e2

Source:

roberts perl tutorial

McGrath, Mike. Perl in easy steps. Southam: Computer Step, 2004.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Bodybuilding: Eddie Hall

Self-tutoring about point of view: the tutor mentions a discussion with his son.

Returning from the gym this morning, my son mentioned Eddie Hall.

“He dead-lifted 500kg. From the exertion, he forgot his children’s names for two weeks.”

I paused, then looked at my son. “Well, I guess that was a great accomplishment, then.”

“Obviously.”

When a person is really devoted to a pursuit, they celebrate the sacrifice it can take.

Source:

euronews.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Baking: red velvet cake

Self-tutoring about baking: the tutor nears fulfillment of a long held curiosity.

I first heard of red velvet cake possibly on Master Chef. Since then, I notice it often. I assume it must be something special.

I heard tell that true red velvet cake has cream cheese icing. My wife tells me our kids don’t like cream cheese icing: was my prospect of red velvet cake doomed from the start?

Today I searched the internet for a red velvet cake recipe, pretending not to recall the necessity of cream cheese icing. Sure enough, I found a recipe that doesn’t require it; rather, it includes icing from milk, butter, vanilla, etc. I made that one; the cakes are cooling on wire racks, nearly ready to ice. I just have to finish the icing.

I’ll let you know how it turns out.

Source:

allrecipes.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Cooking: pork roast internal temperature

Self-tutoring about cooking: the tutor mentions findings about the desired internal temperature of pork roast.

Yesterday I looked up the internal temperature for pork roast. Here are my findings, as I understand:

USDAHealth Canada
145F (followed by 3+ minute rest before cutting or eating)160F

The USDA used to recommend internal temp of 160F for pork roast, but changed it back in 2011: now, they claim that an internal temp of 145F, followed by 3+ minutes’ rest, is sufficient.

For ground pork the necessary internal temperature is 160F: both authorities agree.

Why the USDA maintains 160F for ground pork I will cover in a coming post:)

Source:

health-canada

usda

thespruceeats.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Computer science: regular expressions w/ Perl

Perl tutoring: the tutor comments about square brackets in Perl regex.

Perl regexmatch string
/[beat24]/string containing any of b,e,a,t,2,or 4.
/beat24/string containing the exact sequence beat24

Source:

McGrath, Mike. Perl in easy steps. Southam: Computer Step, 2004.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Agriculture: sweet sorghum, part II

More self-tutoring about sweet sorghum: the tutor continues about the traditional US syrup.

In yesterday’s post I bring up “local molasses” – aka, sweet sorghum or sorghum syrup.

Charmingly, the tradition of sorghum syrup production endures: I’ve included links below to a couple of videos that show the process, as well as one just for more information.

I’ve never noticed sorghum syrup for sale up here, but never looked for it, either. I will check the shelves of stores:)

Source:

Northwest Arkansas Democrat-Gazette

Danna Gesellchen

farmflavor.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Agriculture: molasses vs “local molasses”

Self-tutoring about US farming traditions: the tutor mentions “local molasses.”

Although we weren’t farmers, I grew up around it. A couple of times, local kids told me I didn’t have the stuff for farm life. Regardless, I absorbed the culture like a shirt hung on the line absorbs the spring scent. I continue to love farming, if only from afar.

Last week, when I read the phrase “local molasses”, written by a Kentuckian, I was intrigued. “Molasses comes from sugar cane, which they don’t grow in Kentucky,” I thought, “so what do they mean?”

Source plantSyrup
sugarcanemolasses
sorghumsorghum syrup aka sweet sorghum aka “local molasses”

Sweet sorghum is a grass that can grow over 12 feet tall. In the US it’s identified with the South, lead perhaps by Kentucky. From sweet sorghum cane, sugary juice can be pressed, then cooked down into “local molasses.”

I’ll follow up this post:)

Source:

www.uky.edu

americansorghum.com

seriouseats.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Lifestyle: holiday events: before or after the day?

Self-tutoring about holidays: the tutor philosophizes about when their events might be held.

A couple of days ago I drove by a sign advertising a Valentine’s dance:

Valentine’s DanceSaturday February 16

Immediately I was charmed by the message, because of its obvious compromise: the Saturday after Valentine’s Day, as opposed to the day itself, February 14, which this year is a Thursday.

A question I’ve often wondered about: “Should the party be held the weekend before, or after its actual holiday when that day happens during the work week?”

More and more I prefer the idea of holding the event the weekend after its holiday. My reasoning is that, when the party is held a few days past its holiday, so are its good feelings. Perhaps, by extension, the happy meaning of that day might vibrate longer still, given the precedent of being held over.

Therefore, I agree with the notion of holding the dance the 16th rather than the 9th.

Furthermore, the theme of Valentine’s Day should endure throughout the year, wouldn’t one hope?

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Chemistry: hygroscopic

Tutoring chemistry, definitions are important. The tutor mentions the term hygroscopic.

hygroscopic (adj):readily collecting water, including water vapor.

A sample of hygroscopic material can draw in water from the air, thereby gaining mass invisibly as it sits, uncovered, on the desk. Therefore, its number of moles may not be relatable to its mass, because of the unknown mass of water it may contain.

Source:

ilpi.com

thoughtco.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Chemistry: anhydrous

Tutoring chemistry, definitions are always of interest. The tutor brings up the term anhydrous

anhydrous (adj): containing no water.

As I understand, the particles of an anhydrous substance are not associated with water, but likely would be if not for human intervention. Therefore, when something is described as anhydrous, it was likely put through a dehydrating (drying) process to become that way.

Source:

chem.ucla

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

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