Religion: does God know the future?

Self-tutoring about religion: the tutor examines a notion.

Often, talking about the future, you may hear someone say, “God knows.”

Yet, does God know the future? In Genesis 3.9, God asks, “Where are you?” to Adam and Eve. When Adam explains they are hiding because they are naked, God asks, “Who told you that you were naked? Have you eaten from the tree of which I commanded you not to eat?”

Genesis verses 3.9 through 3.11 suggest that God is surprised that Adam and Eve have eaten from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. Therefore, the Bible suggests to me that God does not always predict the future.

Source:

New American Standard Bible. La Habra: Lockman Foundation, 1973.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Business: what is a gilt?

Self-tutoring about investment instruments: the tutor finds a definition for gilt.

A gilt is a type of UK government bond.

dmo.gov.uk

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Health: COVID-19 symptom(s) vs cold or flu

Self-tutoring about coronavirus: the tutor looks into specific symptoms.

Since COVID-19 seems to have arrived during cold/flu season, an obvious question is, “If a person is sick, then do they have COVID-19 or just ‘the flu’ or a cold?”

From my research this morning, it seems that the symptom associated with COVID-19 but not with flu or cold is shortness of breath.

Source:

businessinsider.com

mayoclinic.org

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

History: what is a telephone “party line?”

Self-tutoring about lifestyle history: the tutor mentions the idea of a party line.

I was at an apartment in the late ’80s where the resident said she had a “party line.” I didn’t know what she meant, but didn’t ask. Instead I stored the idea in memory, thinking one day I’d find out what “party line” means. Today is the day.

Apparently, a party line is shared by multiple households. When the phone rings, it does so at every address on the party line. However, each address has its distinct ring pattern, so everyone on the party line can tell if it’s “for them.” At the same time, anyone on the party line can pick it up, and if others are talking on it, can listen in. While the line is in use, no one else sharing it can make a call.

Party lines were common after WWII, when phone service was catching up with demand. For perhaps decades, the only way many people could afford phone service was to share a party line.

Nowadays, a few thousand party lines still exist in the US, but many only have one subscriber left on them.

Starting around 1988, phone companies adopted the preference to discontinue party lines. Therefore, that party line I knew of – probably in ’88 or ’89 – may not have had long left.

Source:

techchannel.att.com

mentalfloss.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English: recalcitrant

Self-tutoring about vocabulary: the tutor mentions recalcitrant.

recalcitrant (adj): defiant of authority or duty.

Hilariously, as a kid, I was called recalcitrant by someone who truly was. Perhaps it “takes one to know one:)”

I hear recalcitrant rarely nowadays.

Source:

Mish, Frederick C. The Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Springfield: Merriam-Webster, 2004.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Biology: extinct, extirpated, and extant

Self-tutoring about biological terms: the tutor mentions definitions of three related ones.

extinct: no longer existing anywhere.

extirpated: no longer existing in a place it used to. However, it still does exist elsewhere.

extant: existing.

The trees and birds you see are members of extant species.

Extirpation happens commonly: the timber rattlesnake, for instance, is extirpated from Ontario, but still lives wild in many US states.

Source:

forestsociety.org

ontario.ca

dec.ny.gov

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Behaviour: cats and cars

Self-tutoring about animal behaviour: the tutor makes an observation connected with a long-ago memory.

Many years ago I overheard someone discussing various animals’ behaviour as they would cross the highway.

“Cats, if they see a car coming, always turn around and run back the way they came,” they related.

This morning, from a window, I noticed a large cat crossing the road. Three-quarters across, it heard a “toot” from a slow-moving car.

The cat is very large, and so its reversal was dramatic. It easily made it back; the car’s driver was moving gently so as to give it time. The point is that the cat, only a few feet from the side it had wanted to go, turned back and re-crossed to get out of the car’s way. It happened just as the person had described, so many years ago.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Lifestyle during the ***demic: the tutor comments

Self-tutoring with a snapshot of life right now: the tutor relates.

I went grocery shopping a while back. You can read my post about it here.

Around noon today, I returned to the grocery store. Only able-bodied people were about. The store wasn’t crowded and no-one seemed in a hurry. There wasn’t a line-up to speak of. The TP was gone, but nothing else.

I was with my 17-year-old son this time. We had a lot of fun – it was great to be out in the world and feel normal again. (I haven’t been self-isolating on purpose, but since everyone else is, I’ve been living like a recluse at home.)

There were some nice deals at the supermarket. Bananas and numerous other produce items were on special, and so were bread and bagels.

I am really impressed with how society is coping with this new situation: you’d be sure, standing in that supermarket, that life is normal. It was a great feeling. We couldn’t help but be happy as we moved casually through the aisles.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Computer science: significance of multiple cores

Self-tutoring about computer design: the tutor comments on what “multiple cores” means.

As I understand, the benefit of a multi-core processor is that each core can work its own job simultaneously with the others. However many cores there are, that’s how many separate tasks a computer can work on at once.

Source:

Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne. Operating System Concepts. Danvers: John Wiley & Sons, 2018.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Canadian geography, weather: driest month in Greenwood, Nova Scotia?

Self-tutoring about Canadian weather: the tutor notices a curious fact.

The driest month in Greenwood, Nova Scotia, is April, which apparently receives 83mm of precipitation. Interestingly, March there receives almost an inch more, at perhaps 95mm.

Source:

en.climate-data.org

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.
Top