Category: english

Vocabulary: irrupt

Tutoring English, new words – especially short ones – are always interesting. The tutor mentions irrupt. irrupt (verb): to suddenly arrive, or else increase. A population can irrupt, for instance. Source: Mish, Frederick C (editor). The Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Springfield: Merriam-Webster,

English: initiate, the noun

Tutoring English, unfamiliar words can surface – or less familiar uses of common ones. initiate (noun): someone accepted into a group, perhaps in a ceremonial manner. Source: Barber, Katherine et al. Oxford Canadian Dictionary of Current English. Don Mills: Oxford

English: “Minder”

Self-tutoring about English: the tutor reminisces, mentioning the term “minder”. When I was a kid, I used to watch a British TV show called Minder. I’d say it wasn’t a comedy, yet was very funny. It was about a small-time

English: liminal

Tutoring English, vocabulary evolves. The tutor mentions liminal. liminal (adj): occurring at a boundary, possibly straddling it. Source: dictionary.cambridge.org

English: what is a saltbox house?

Tutoring English, new vocabulary continually surfaces. The tutor mentions saltbox. saltbox: a house two storeys in front, but one in back. In pioneer times, the rear, one-storey section could be an add-on that developed from extending the roof back and

English: exurb

Tutoring English, discoveries continue. The tutor mentions exurb. exurb: a town outside a larger city, located past its suburbs. Source: Barber, Katherine et al. Oxford Canadian Dictionary of Current English. Don Mills: Oxford University Press, 2005.

English: soundscape

Tutoring English, discoveries continue. The tutor mentions soundscape. In yesterday’s post I mention how a varied thrush’s song dominated the soundscape. At the time of writing, I was seeking a word and tried soundscape, unaware it actually is a word.

English: pre-emption

Tutoring English, discoveries continue. The tutor mentions pre-emption. pre-emption (noun): an action that successfully replaces or prevents another. Source: Barber, Katherine et al. Oxford Canadian Dictionary of Current English. Don Mills: Oxford University Press, 2005

English: hilarities?

Tutoring English, a specific question arises: the tutor investigates if hilarity can pluralize to hilarities. In my Feb 14 post I use the word hilarities, which the spell-checker doesn’t like, though it’s happy with hilarity. So, is the word hilarities

English: is it relatable?

Tutoring English, you never run out of material. The tutor shares an observation – will it be relatable? relatable (adj): 1. sensibly connected to some other event or state; 2. understandable by others. The word relatable is listed by a

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