Geography: leopards in Europe

Self-tutoring about geography: the tutor mentions the fact that leopards live in Europe.

In yesterday’s post I mention that the Republic of Georgia’s northern border is often described as the border between Europe and Asia, yet even so, Georgia considers itself to be European. Whichever is the case, southern Russia, alongside Georgia, must be European.

Persian leopards inhabit the Caucasus, including the Russian Caucasus along the Georgian border. Therefore, leopards do indeed live in Europe.

Source:

www.animalspot.net

www.arkive.org

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Geography: the border between Europe and Asia, part 0: the Caucasus Region

Self-tutoring about geography: the tutor researches the Euro-Asian border.

According to the CIA World Factbook, Georgia is in Asia, yet identifies as European.

Some define the Euro-Asian border, in fact, as Georgia’s northern border, in the Caucasus Mountains. From that point of view, Georgia and south is in Asia.

Yet, some geographers refer to a “border region” in the Caucasus, rather than a border, between Europe and Asia. They conceive it to include Armenia and Azerbaijan as well.

Interestingly, the EU describes the definition of Europe as cultural as well as geographical.

Source:

www.worldatlas.com

www.worldatlas.com

www.worldatlas.com

www.worldatlas.com

www.cia.gov

Stanford, Quentin H. (editor). Canadian Oxford School Atlas, 6th ed. Toronto: Oxford University Press.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Geography: world percent urban vs rural

Self-tutoring about geography: the tutor notices an article about percent world population now living in urban settings.

Apparently, in 1960, the world was 2:1 rural to urban. As I understood, when I was a kid, most people on Earth lived by subsistence agriculture. Even in North America, some people still did. My conception is that subsistence agriculturalists are typically rural, so when they dominated the world population, it, too, had to be.

Today, however, with the world developing, subsistence agriculture is waning in favour of the cash economy. Such must be the case: 55% of the world is now urban, according to the source I read this morning.

Source:

ourworldindata.org

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Canadian Geography: Sable Island, Part 0

Self-tutoring about Canadian geography: the tutor begins about a famous, yet remote, part of his home province.

Sable Island, from the French sable, meaning sand, is a connected arc of sand dunes that form an island about 175 km off the coast of Nova Scotia.

The Island might have a crew of five; to my knowledge, all are staff of various government agencies. The runway is the beach.

A few hundred horses roam wild on Sable Island, protected from human interference since 1960 by Prime Minister John Diefenbaker.

The Island is about 42km long, and up to 1.5km wide, but its dimensions change as the dunes shift. Miraculously, there are freshwater ponds on it whence the horses drink.

I hope to mention more about Sable Island in future posts:)

Source:

wikipedia

Land and Sea: Sable Island

Rick Mercer Reports

www.cbc.ca

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Does the natural range of crocodiles extend into Israel?

Self-tutoring about geography: the tutor wonders if crocodiles formerly lived in Israel.

Apparently, crocodiles inhabited the Kebara swamps, Israel, into the early 1900s.

Source:

blogs.scientificamerican.com

en.parks.org.il

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

What is a wadi?

Self-tutoring about geography: the tutor inquires about the meaning of wadi.

wadi (noun): a stream bed that is usually dry but carries water during a rainy period.
The term wadi is specific to the Middle East and North Africa.

Source:

Mish, Frederick C. The Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Springfield: Merriam-Webster, 2004.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

The African and Arabian plates, part 1: the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea

Self-tutoring about geology: the tutor mentions the surprising depth of the Gulf of Aqaba, and its reason.

Plate tectonics describes the floating masses of rock that constitute the Earth’s crust and drift across the magma beneath. Most plates roughly correspond to known land masses, such as the African Plate.

The junction between the African Plate and the Arabian marks the Great Rift Valley, a deep crack in the Earth’s crust. It runs under the Red Sea, then under the Gulf of Aqaba. Hence, the Gulf of Aqaba is 1850m deep, while the Gulf of Suez, only 50km west, is less than 100m deep.

Source:

wikipedia

wikipedia

www.newworldencyclopedia.org

www.livescience.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

How rare is a four-leaf clover?

Self-tutoring about plant lore: the tutor researches four-leaf clovers.

The rarity of the four-leaf clover is around 1:10000, research suggests.

I’ve never found a four-leaf clover. However, one summer when I was a kid, one of my friends found one, I think in late May. That was when I was in grade 3, in PEI.

A week later the same kid found another. The trend continued all summer: he just kept finding them. I can’t recall anyone else ever doing so.

Some reading suggests that, because of genetics, four-leaf clovers might be found in clusters. However, that wasn’t how my friend found them; he found them anywhere. While we were awaiting other friends or wondering what to do next, he’d look down: “Another four-leaf clover!” he’d exclaim. He found one on a patch of earth almost bare of grass.

I always wondered how he did it, finding all those four-leaf clovers. I hope to find one someday. I left PEI when I was 10, and haven’t been back since. Yet, not having found a four-leaf clover there, even though I guess they were all around, leaves me to recall the wide blue skies and vast green fields and long sunny days of summer there.

My grade 8 kid just walked in. He says his friend, like mine from long ago, often found four-leaf clovers when they were in grade 3, but not really since. Curious, eh?

Source:

blog.minitab.com

thescienceexplorer.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Geography: maple syrup production

Tutoring geography, agriculture is topical. The tutor brings up maple syrup production by region.

Of course my kids have this Friday off, so I made them (and myself) pancakes for breakfast. While they actually prefer plain syrup, I like maple syrup on mine.

Which provinces (or states) are notable producers of maple syrup?

  1. Quebec leads (perhaps no surprise): 7,989,000 gallons.
  2. Vermont is next, at about 11% of Quebec’s output.
  3. Ontario comes next, at about 5% of Quebec’s output.
  4. The states of New York and Maine come next, at about 4% each of Quebec.
  5. New Brunswick is next, at 3.8% of Quebec.
  6. Six US states come next.
  7. Nova Scotia follows, at about 0.3% of Quebec.

Interesting, eh?

Source:

www.maplesyrupworld.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Canadian Geography: two Lawrencetowns in Nova Scotia?

Tutoring social studies, the Maritimes enter the conversation. The tutor mentions a discovery he made a couple of days ago about Nova Scotia.

Recently, looking at a map of Nova Scotia, I noticed a place called Lawrencetown, perhaps about 5 miles east of Dartmouth.

“Lawrencetown’s in the Annapolis Valley,” I thought to myself. “It’s northwest of Dartmouth, maybe 50 miles as the crow flies.”

I moved the map around on the web page, and behold! Both Lawrencetowns were apparent – the one in the Annapolis Valley I knew as a kid, as well as the one east of Dartmouth.

I hadn’t known there were two.

Source:

google.com/maps

latlong.net

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.