History: what does GI stand for in GI Joe?

Self-tutoring about pop culture and history: the tutor researches another question he’s often wondered about.

GI: galvanized iron, apparently. With time, it took on a broader meaning, eventually referring even to recruits.

BTW: not all sources seem to agree about the meaning of GI.

Source:

funtrivia.com

internationalskeptics.com

definitions.net

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

When did the Jesuits begin?

Self-tutoring about history: the tutor gives a brief about the Jesuits.

The Jesuits are a Catholic religious order begun in 1534, and approved by Pope Paul III in 1540. Their main aim is helping people from a Catholic viewpoint, hopefully converting them to Catholicism.

In Europe the Jesuits went to work reclaiming converts from Protestantism. Later they traveled to colonies to bring the Catholic religion. Education was a key focus of the Jesuits.

The Jesuits continue their mission.

Source:

www.history.com

www.thecanadianencylopedia.ca

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

How much is a talent (unit of mass)?

Self-tutoring about antiquity: the tutor brings up the ancient unit of mass talent.

Talent is a measure used for precious metals in the Old Testament – for instance, in 1 Kings 10.10. How much was a talent?

Apparently, a talent, back then, may have been as low as 30kg, but as high as 60kg. 30kg seems the more likely number for the days of Solomon, who apparently lived around 1000BCE.

Source:

wikipedia.org

wikipedia.org

www.convert-me.com

www.ancient.eu/solomon

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Ronald Reagan and ice cream

Self-tutoring about history and dessert: the tutor shares a find about Ronald Reagan.

I was a kid while Reagan was in power in the United States. Times were heady: the Cold War was reaching its climax. Most people probably recall Reagan as the tough president who wouldn’t back down from the Soviets. He earned their respect, and mine as well.

Reagan loved the American way of life. In fact, back in ’84, he designated July as National Ice Cream Month. More specifically, July’s third Sunday would be National Ice Cream Day. He recommended Americans come up with fitting ways to embrace the occasion.

Reagan was always smiling. I regret I never got to share a bowl of ice cream with him:)

Source:

www.idfa.org

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English, history: whence the saying “That’s all she wrote”?

Self-tutoring: the tutor inquires about the origin of the popular saying “That’s all she wrote.”

Apparently “That’s all she wrote” originates from WWII: if an American serviceman received a letter saying only “Dear John,” he’d been deserted by its writer. Observing the brevity of the letter, its receiver would report “That’s all she wrote” to share that his lady back home had left him. Therefore, “That’s all she wrote” meant not only the letter ended, but the relationship also had.

I had hoped, perhaps, for a more intriguing story behind “That’s all she wrote.” However, two sources suggest it arose as explained above. Hence, for this post, “That’s all she wrote:)”

Source:

word-ancestry.livejournal.com/60070.html

www.phrases.org

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Music, history: the 85-key piano

Seeing an antique can trigger self-tutoring: the tutor shares a find.

A few days back my son, visiting a historic site, was invited to play the piano. After awhile he pointed out that it starts – and ends – with an A key.

The pianos that I’ve seen, as both my sons pointed out, start with a bass A but end with a treble C. Our piano at home is like so. Such pianos have 88 keys.

The antique one that starts with a bass A, but ends with a treble A as well, three keys earlier than I’ve ever seen – is it common? Well, common enough, especially among pianos from the 1800s, apparently.

Source:

livingpianos.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

History: Battle of Hastings: what was William’s claim?

Tutoring history or social studies, you might be asked about the Battle of Hastings. The tutor explains why it happened.

William’s claim

William of Normandy was a cousin of Edward the Confessor, King of England 1042-1066. Supposedly, William visited Edward, in England, in 1051. Some believe that, during that visit, Edward promised he would name William to succeed him as King of England.

Edward the Confessor died in January 1066; just before, he named Harold Godwine to take over as England’s king. Thinking the English crown had already been promised to him, William invaded England in September 1066 to claim his right.

Source:

www.history.com

www.bbc.co.uk

www.historylearningsite.co.uk

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English, economics, history: what is mercantilism?

Tutoring a number of subjects, the term mercantilism might arise. The tutor defines it.

mercantilism

economic policy that favours exports, discourages imports, and has the objective of amassing precious metals.

Source:

Barber, Katherine et al. Oxford Canadian Dictionary of Current English. Don Mills: Oxford University Press, 2005.

www.investopedia.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English, history: what does wassail mean?

Tutoring English, new vocabulary is always interesting. The tutor shares the meaning of wassail and its holiday connection.

wassail (verb): to celebrate with drinking

In the Yule celebrations, people would not only wassail each other, but also crops and trees.

Source:

wicca.com

Mish, Frederick C (editor). The Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Springfield: Merriam-Webster, 2004.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English, history: AD vs CE

Tutoring English, conventions are important. The tutor brings up one he was curious about.

As far as I can determine, timewise, the two acronyms AD and CE have the same meaning. However, their literal meanings are different:

AD anno domini: year of our lord

CE: common era

The reason CE might be used is to avoid religious connection to a given topic.

Source:

bible.org

english.stackexchange.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.