Tutoring statistics, you might imagine everyday situations. The tutor brings up one. Let’s imagine we have two mile runners. Runner 1, called R1, has mean time 4:45, with standard deviation 10s; R2 has mean time 5:00 with standard deviation 12s. …

Statistics: how often can something “better” be expected to perform better? Read more »

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The tutor offers points about combining probabilities. My gut reaction, thinking about when to add probabilities, is that it’s done less often than multiplying. However, there is one obvious type of situation in which you add: Example 1 Each ticket …

Probability: when to add, when to multiply Read more »

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The tutor continues with some explanation of last post’s Perl random walk simulation. Below is the Perl code from last post, this time with some comments (recall that # denotes a comment in Perl): #!/usr/bin/perl # needed for Linux (Unix) …

Perl random walk simulation: code explanation Read more »

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The tutor is happy to introduce the elegant topic of Markov chains. A Markov chain is a sequence of states through which a probability system can pass. It’s not so complex as it sounds. Consider the following example: Ms A …

Probability: Markov chains: introduction Read more »

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