Health: does stress cause insulin resistance?

Self-tutoring about health: the tutor looks to connect stress with insulin resistance.

Insulin resistance refers to the condition that cells no longer respond to insulin as readily as before, so the body releases more.

Apparently, insulin resistance can be augmented by stress.

Source:

nih.gov

drhyman.com

holtorfmed.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Health: mistaking thirst for hunger

Self-tutoring about cues: the tutor looks into possible confusion between hunger and thirst.

Apparently, feeling thirsty but thinking it means hunger, really happens.

The advice I’ve read to prevent hazard from the confusion:

  1. Drink water throughout the day. Then, you might not develop thirst, since you’ll prevent it.

  2. If you feel hungry, but haven’t drunk water in a while, drink some water first, then wait. If the hunger persists, and you indeed know you’re awhile since eating, likely you really are hungry.

HTH:)

Source:

pkdcure.org

www.seattletimes.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Health: a hot shower might make you feel better, but why?

Self-tutoring about the habit of showering twice a day: the tutor wonders if it brings more benefits than cleanliness.

A hot shower can seem surprisingly rejuvenating, but does it bring real change to body chemistry? Perhaps yes.

Apparently, a hot shower can promote oxytocin release in the body. One of oxytocin’s effects is to relieve anxiety.

Believe it or not, a hot shower can also cause the release of growth hormone, which promotes healing.

Apparently, a hot shower likely has true biochemical effects.

Source:

healthguidance.org

menshealth.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Serotonin: why someone might crave carbohydrates

Self-tutoring about health, diet and mood: the tutor finds a connection between eating carbohydrates and mood.

Of course, some people eat because it makes them feel happy rather than because they are hungry. (I am one such person;) Is there an easy connection between eating and mood elevation?

Perhaps yes: serotonin. Serotonin is believed to reduce depression and perhaps promote contentment. Its release is augmented by eating carbohydrates but not by eating protein.

Interesting, eh?

Source:

nih.gov

healthline.com

nih.gov

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

What is ketosis?

Self-tutoring about health: the tutor looks into ketosis.

ketosis (noun):

a state of metabolism in which ketones are being consumed for fuel. It results from low availability of glucose due to low carbohydrate intake.
During ketosis, the body releases fat stores into the bloodstream. In the liver, the fat is transformed into ketones that cells can use for energy.
Ketosis is a natural process that normally does not pose risk to a healthy person. However, to people with health conditions – diabetes, for instance – ketosis may pose serious risk.

Source:

www.webmd.com

dtc.ucsf.edu

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Key ideas to help choose whey protein for muscle growth

Self-tutoring about muscle building nutrition: the tutor looks into whey protein.

Two features I look for in whey protein:

  1. The first ingredient being whey protein isolate or hydrolysate (or hydrolyzed whey protein).
  2. A scoop should yield at least 80% protein (divide the grams protein per scoop by total grams per scoop).

Source:

www.muscleandfitness.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Effects of stress and cortisol, Part 1

Self-tutoring about stress and health: the tutor explores some effects of cortisol.

Back in my post from March 14 I bring up cortisol, Part 0. I observe therein that cortisol is released in response to stress. Cortisol, in turn, causes a flood of glucose into the bloodstream without a corresponding increase in insulin. The reason: neither brain cells nor exercising skeletal muscle cells need insulin to take up glucose, while fat cells do. Therefore, the cortisol makes a deluge of calories available for the brain and skeletal muscles so the body can solve the stress it faces.

A consequence of cortisol is that it can suppress normal body functions in favour of the stress response. In nature, the threat would soon pass, then the stress would release and the normal body functions would resume. However, the modern, long-term stress people can face may lead to elevated cortisol long-term. Immunity, digestion, reproduction, and growth can be disrupted. Elevated cortisol, combined with adrenaline and other hormones of stress response, can eventually compromise a patient’s physical and mental health.

Exercise can help regulate stress, as well as consume the immediate calorie flood that accompanies elevated cortisol.

Source:

www.mayoclinic.org

www.mayoclinic.org

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

What is the 2 hour, 4 hour rule for food safety?

Self-tutoring about food safety: the tutor brings up the 2 hour, 4 hour rule.

During summer, food safety might be apropos, for a couple of reasons:

  1. People often cook food for outdoors, and possibly large batches.
  2. The elevated temperature might cause more rapid spoilage.

One rule I find interesting is the 2 hour, 4 hour rule, which refers to foods that are harmful to consume if they spoil. It focuses on time the food has spent between 5°C and 60°C, and assumes refrigeration temperature < 5°C.

2 hour, 4 hour rule:

  • 0 to 2 hours: safe to use or refrigerate.
  • 2 to 4 hours: safe to use but too late to refrigerate.
  • > 4 hours: discard.

Source:

www.sahealth.sa.gov.au

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Licorice anti-inflammatory effect

Self-tutoring about home remedies: the tutor inquires about licorice.

My wife mentioned to me that licorice can have anti-inflammatory effect. I looked up the idea for confirmation.

From the NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information, United States) point of view, licorice has observed anti-inflammatory effect.

Source:

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Food: banana: a good source of fibre?

More lifestyle self-tutoring: the tutor mentions the fibre content of a banana.

A typical banana has around 100 calories, with 2.6g of fibre.

Suggested fibre intake might be 14g per 1000 calories, or 1.4g per 100 calories. The banana offers nearly twice that amount of fibre: I’d call it a good source fibre.

Source:

draxe.com

healthyeating.sfgate.com

www.healthline.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.