Is eggshell bad for you?

Self-tutoring about cooking: the tutor revisits another question from his youth.

I was told, as a kid, to make sure no eggshell gets into food because eggshell is bad for you. Is it, really?

Apparently, eggshell isn’t bad for you, according to sources I’ve consulted. Eggshell in food is unattractive, yes, but not inherently poisonous.

Source:

www.healthline.com

Tech Insider, youtube

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Tomato leaf: I ate one

Self-tutoring about tomato leaf edibility: the tutor shares his first experiment.

Back in my October 11 post I mention research that suggests tomato leaves are edible, at least in small to moderate amounts.

Well, I ate a large tomato leaf yesterday straight from the garden. It was bitter, scratchy, and tingly on the tongue – I wondered if I’d made a mistake.

I never felt any ill effects, however.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Breakfast showdown: nutella® vs cream cheese

Self-tutoring about breakfast foods: the tutor makes a comparison between cream cheese and nutella®

Bagel and cream cheese is a classic, of course. Yet, nutella® is definitely part of our culture now. What about a comparison between them? The cream cheese I’m using for reference is a common dairy brand.

  • nutella® is 5.3% protein, but the cream cheese is 6.7%.
  • nutella® is 31.6% fat, while the cream cheese is 33.3%.
  • nutella® is 57.9% sugar; the cream cheese is 0%.
  • Calories: per 15 gram serving, nutella® has 78.9; the cream cheese has 50.

No doubt, other varieties of cream cheese, with different fat content, are available. For the comparison, I’m using the one I always buy.

Interesting, eh?

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Are tomato leaves poisonous?

Self-tutoring about food: the tutor asks himself a question out of the blue, and finds a surprising answer.

As a kid, I was told tomato leaves are poisonous. Yet, are they?

I’ve found three sources, this morning, that mention tomato leaves being consumed. One tells of using them in tomato sauce, while another considers them a garden green. Perhaps, in small-to-moderate doses, tomato leaves might be safe to eat, for most people.

Apparently, tomato leaves do contain compounds that are toxic in large doses: eating a lot of them at once might lead to toxic overload.

I plan to experiment by eating a few tomato leaves from the garden. I’ll let you know what happens, if I don’t die:)

Source:

www.thekitchn.com

laidbackgardener.blog

www.foodrepublic.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Rhubarb: 1) Must you peel the stalk? 2)A rhubarb dish.

Self-tutoring about rhubarb: the tutor shares findings.

As a kid I ate dishes prepared from rhubarb stalks – strawberry-rhubarb pie, for instance, as well as stewed rhubarb. Nowadays I seldom eat rhubarb, and never buy it. However, my wife brought some home last week: what to do?

Rhubarb leaves are poisonous. I’ve also heard people say you need to peel the stalks.

At first I set out to discover if peeling the stalks is necessary. Apparently, it isn’t, so I didn’t. My wife and I have both eaten helpings of what I made, with no effects. Therefore, from my own experience, the rhubarb stalk needn’t be peeled.

I found this this recipe for rhubarb upside-down cake, and made it. My wife loves it; I find it delivers everything you might hope from an easy rhubarb dessert.

Source:

Clean & Delicious

bhg.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Lifestyle: baking: can you line a baking pan with wax paper?

Self-tutoring: the tutor inquires whether wax paper can be used to line a pan for baking.

Two sources indicate that wax paper can be used for baking, but only under the following two conditions:

  1. The batter must completely cover the wax paper.
  2. The wax paper does not come in direct contact with the oven’s heat.

Source:

www.reynoldskitchens.com

food52.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Food: banana: a good source of fibre?

More lifestyle self-tutoring: the tutor mentions the fibre content of a banana.

A typical banana has around 100 calories, with 2.6g of fibre.

Suggested fibre intake might be 14g per 1000 calories, or 1.4g per 100 calories. The banana offers nearly twice that amount of fibre: I’d call it a good source fibre.

Source:

draxe.com

healthyeating.sfgate.com

www.healthline.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

English, food: fibre, or fiber?

Food research leads to self-tutoring: the tutor follows a query about spelling.

When I type fibre, the screen cautions me I might have it wrong. Really?

fibre:

Merriam-Webster: British of fiber

Oxford Canadian: dietary fibre

Oxford Canadian doesn’t list fiber. Merriam-Webster does: from their point of view, one of its meanings is dietary fibre.

Source:

Mish, Frederick C. (ed). The Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Springfield: Merriam-Webster, 2004.

Barber, Katherine et al. Oxford Canadian Dictionary of Current English. Don Mills: Oxford University Press, 2005.

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.

Food: dark raisins vs golden

More self-tutoring: a question crystallizes in the tutor’s mind, so he looks up the difference between dark raisins and golden ones.

Talking about raisins produced in California, dark raisins and golden ones commonly begin as green grapes (typically, Thompson Seedless).

If the grapes are dried in the sun, they brown – hence, dark raisins.

If the grapes are dehydrated out of the sun, in managed humidity, golden raisins can result.

Source:

www.epicurious.com

www.monrovia.com

Jack of Oracle Tutoring by Jack and Diane, Campbell River, BC.